Talk:Nave

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Uses[edit]

I have removed the disgraceful canards "and on weekdays the large open area often served for the town marketplace, political meetings, places of various trades including, on some occasions, even that of prostitution. Often smelling of animal dung and human urine, naves were not very clean places. Hence, rood screens aka jubes were designed to separate the more sacred areas of the cathedral and keep out the unwashed and unholy." Ignorant fantasy, with protestant evangelical "moneychangers in the temple" overtones, an embarrassment, no better in its way than the equally foolish "built by willing hands from the pious citizenry" line one sometimes has to listen to. With all the NPOV talk at Wikipedia, more history, less attitude, please. Wetman 21:34, 4 Jul 2004 (UTC)

Yes, but it is fairly well documented. Many Operas and Plays refer to naves and side chapels being used to conduct all kinds of clandestine business, flirting, socialising, etc. For example the first lines in "The Changeling" are 'Twas in the temple where i first beheld her, and now again the same; what omen yet follows of that?" The matters then move to a discussion of business affairs Excalibur (talk) 00:39, 31 December 2007 (UTC)

Removed image[edit]

The mixed Gothic and Romanesque nave of Buckfast Abbey, Devon, England, built by Cistercian monks between 1907 and 1937.

I hope no one will be upset that this nice image is removed. It has no visual information that was not better presented in the very similar illustration that is kept. The article does still need a good image showing the emphasis within a nave of a crossing. A Renaissance nave that shows all these nave features but in Classical detailing is needed too. A nave from the exterior showing flying buttresses could tie in. An illustration that shows changes of level between nave and chancel would surely provoke some good added text. Images looking the other way, showing the effects of a rose window or of a choirloft on the nave would elicit more Nave Chat. --Wetman 12:47, 26 Mar 2005 (UTC)

Tallest nave[edit]

I added the 'dubious' tag to the claim that St. John the Divine is the tallest nave. Though it is a lovely church, it's nave is decidedly shorter than that of Amiens Cathedral or several others, if I remember right. I'd like to find an actual tallest nave for the title but I'm not sure what that is--might be the Cathedral of La Palma, maybe Florence Cathedral. 63.167.237.65 21:18, 20 January 2007 (UTC)

nave in Hamlet[edit]

In additon to "bowl the round nave down the hill of heaven," Hamlet contains a wheel motif which includes a triple pun on knave/nave: "There's nary a villain dwelling [= place where villains live = hamlet] in all Denmark but he's an arrant knave"... "without more circumstance...for my own part... I'll go pray" [nave of church] "the cease of majesty...is a massy wheel...to whose huge spokes ten thousand lesser things " [The Hamlet line of kings are like naves with their subjects as spokes. Hamlet wants to breach that custom and be more like the nave of a church.] ... "These are but whirling words" For more details, see http://academia.wikia.com/wiki/Motifs_in_Hamlet#Fine_Revoluton --Ray Eston Smith Jr 00:05, 13 March 2007 (UTC)

S.Pietro[edit]

You might consider correcting the record section, since S.Pietro isn't in Rome, nor in Italy.— Preceding unsigned comment added by 62.78.145.119 (talkcontribs) 26 April 2010

longest nave in the united states[edit]

According to wikipedia's own page for Duke Chapel it's a good 60 feet longer than the listed record holder

what's up with that? are any of these records cited? I suck at wikipedia —Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.136.136.101 (talk) 19:02, 19 May 2011 (UTC)

Longest Nave?[edit]

Is it St Albans or Winchester?

To my untrained eye, the pages seem to contradict:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Albans_Cathedral "its nave is the longest of any cathedral in England" "the second longest cathedral in the United Kingdom (after Winchester)"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winchester_Cathedral "It is one of the largest cathedrals in England, with the longest nave and greatest overall length of any Gothic cathedral in Europe"

The article may well be correct, but can someone double-check this is all self consistent? I'm guessing it's some quirk to do with architectural style norman vs gothic?

Mike S — Preceding unsigned comment added by 152.78.120.108 (talk) 13:46, 22 July 2013 (UTC)

Highest Vaulted Nave?[edit]

If St. Peter's (at 46 meters) has the tallest completed nave at 46 meters, there's no way Milan (at 45 meters) can have the tallest completed vaulted nave--the nave of St. Peter's is indeed vaulted, with a barrel vault. Perhaps Milan has the tallest completed rib-vaulted nave? But that's getting dangerously trivial. Perhaps we should just delete the reference to Milan? 206.208.105.129 (talk) 14:57, 30 July 2014 (UTC)