Talk:Necho II

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Untitled[edit]

Many current historians tend to believe Herodotus on this point, mostly because he stated with disbelief that the Phoenicians had the sun on their right hand all the time - in Herodotus's time it was not known that Africa extended south beyond the equator.

I have read the reference in Herodotus, and I've heard this explanation before, but after years of just being familiar with the reference I'm still not sure what this means. How did they have the sun on their right hand the whole time? If they sailed south, across the equator, and then north, across the equator again, how does the sun change position? I get the feeling there is something very obvious that I'm missing...hopefully someone can explain it. Adam Bishop 18:28, 7 Apr 2004 (UTC)

part of the voyage, in southern Africa, would have been sailed westward. And this is the part where they have the sun at the right and Herodot would have expected it at their left. However, to make this true it is necessary that they sailed the Guinea coast during the northern hemisphere Summer, because otherwise it would have been to their left in this period. - Andre Engels 08:47, 21 Jul 2004 (UTC)
Oh yeah...see I knew there was something obvious I was missing :) Adam Bishop 15:09, 21 Jul 2004 (UTC)

Seems to have disappeared[edit]

Got lost here diff=prev&oldid=7473694

According to the Greek historian Herodotus, Necho II sent out an expedition of Phoenicians, which in three years sailed from the Red Sea around Africa to the mouth of the Nile. Many current historians tend to believe Herodotus on this point, mostly because he stated with disbelief that the Phoenicians had the sun on their right hand all the time - in Herodotus's time it was not known that Africa extended south beyond the equator.

Putting it back in ... J. D. Redding 23:59, 7 June 2007 (UTC) The introduction is a bit confused when it uses the word "probably". Presumably no contemporary source refers to him as Necho II. So what cross-reference between figures in Egyptian, Biblical, Greek (and possibly Babylonian) records are we proposing here? PatGallacher (talk) 20:43, 30 April 2009 (UTC)

No tomb and no mummy? Do we have any Egyptologists here? --Anaccuratesource (talk) 03:29, 9 January 2012 (UTC)