Talk:Needham–Schroeder protocol

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What about this "other Needham-Schroeder protocol"[edit]

Look at sec. 10.2 http://www.daimi.au.dk/~ivan/dSik/dSikw4.pdf, material for a course on security on Aarhus University, Denmark, written by Ivan Damgård. It describes another protocol suggested by Needham and Schroeder, which assumes that both users have a public key for the other, does not involve a server and is indeed insecure. And aparently the two concepts were both developed in 1978. How do these relate?

Velle 13:53, 27 August 2006 (UTC)

Good point. There are two different protocols suggested in the same paper. I've written them both up here - arguably the entry could be split in two, if you can be bothered with the resulting disambiguation page.
--IanHarvey 12:13, 8 September 2006 (UTC)


"Needham-Schroeder Symmetric Key Protocol, also known as the Needham-Schroeder Symmetric Key Protocol," That sentence seems a bit redundant. I would assume the "x" is also known as "x". :)