Talk:New York City Subway

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WikiProject New York City (Rated B-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject New York City, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of New York City-related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
Cscr-former.svg New York City Subway is a former featured article candidate. Please view the links under Article milestones below to see why the nomination failed. For older candidates, please check the archive.

Crime section looks very similar to existing source[edit]

The lengthy section on crime looks very similar to the nycsubway.org articles about the 1970s and 1980s.[1][2] I don't have sufficient time or knowledge of wiki definitions of plagiarism to fix the issue, but there are quite a few phrases that are just copied word-for-word. Apparently this has existed since Epicgenius's edits in April.

Some examples that I found in about 30 seconds: "To counteract a 60% jump in crime in 1982, a plan to have uniformed police officers ride the subway between 8pm and 4am was instituted." "Meanwhile, enterprising criminals would steal bus transfers from bus drivers and sell the transfers on the street for 50 cents." "On the IRT Pelham Line in 1980, a sharp rise in window-smashing on subway cars caused $2 million in damages; it spread to other lines during the course of the year. When the broken windows were discovered in trains that were still in service, they needed to be taken out of service, causing additional delays; in August 1980 alone, 775 vandalism-related delays were reported." Level Crossing (talk) 22:58, 30 November 2014 (UTC)

References
  1. ^ "1970s". 
  2. ^ "1980s". 
I am working to remedy this, and so am paraphrasing the section entirely. As stated on my talk page, The text, as with other text in NYC Subway articles, is used with prior permission from the NYCSubway.org website ... but I have paraphrased it a little and also cited the website as a source. Epicgenius (talk) 01:25, 1 December 2014 (UTC)
I have cleaned the section out. Epicgenius (talk) 01:25, 1 December 2014 (UTC)

Bernhard Goetz should be linked to this article[edit]

There's no mention of Bernhard Goetz in this article or even a link to his article. This seems like a major oversight in the crime section. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Dxk3355 (talkcontribs)

That might not be appropriate here, but for sure in the History of the New York City Subway article, in which it is also not mentioned. B137 (talk) 21:38, 3 January 2015 (UTC)

Headways and other technical info[edit]

For being a hot topic especially in the past couple decades, it's surprising to see how much technical info is missing from [rapid] transit articles. When I first starting looking into the subject extensively, I was surprised to see that there are no reports of the top speed or the more relevant average speed of almost any line or system, even the newer ones in places like China where they are constantly touting new technology, high-speed rail, etc. I believe the lowest published headway on the subway is 2 minutes / 120 seconds on a single track, though when a train gets backed up they've been seen to run up to four (I've seen at least three) trains in a five minute period. B137 (talk) 21:38, 3 January 2015 (UTC)

Is this what you are looking for? Vcohen (talk) 22:48, 3 January 2015 (UTC)
Yes that is kind of the format I was looking for. I already saw the general TPH figures for a few lines used as examples in the automation article. B137 (talk) 00:43, 4 January 2015 (UTC)