Talk:Newsagent's shop

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Journalism (Rated Start-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Journalism, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Journalism on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Business (Rated Start-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Business, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of business articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 

A newsagent is not a shop[edit]

Newsagents are not small shops as mentioned in the article; Newsagents are people who work in or own the shop.

That is obvious nonsense. Merely working in a shop that sells newspapers does not make one a newsagent. Nor does working in a grocery make one a grocer. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Contributions/91.85.131.176 ([[User talk:|talk]]) 17:43, 1 October 2009 (UTC)

Just a few factual comments about the previous unsigned comment above: You're quite correct, just working in the shop doesn't make a newsagent. My point really was to point out the difference between "person" and "building". Newsagents (without the possesive apostrophe are people; Newsagent's (WITH the possesive apostrophe are buildings or if you want to pedantic - mobile stands etc). My point was people or buildings.

A newsagent's shop is the shop where the newsagent works. It can be abreviated as Newsagent's, omitting the word shop.

It's the same with Butcher's which is short for Butcher's Shop. Butchers (without the apostrophe) is the plural of Butcher, who is a person. Butchers means more than one Butcher. —Preceding unsigned comment added by World of departure (talkcontribs) 16:58, 1 October 2009 (UTC)

Nope - a butcher is a verb, I butcher, he butchers, they butcher etc. According to [[1]] it's Butchers' shop Contributions/91.210.101.9 ([[User talk:|talk]]) 12:28, 2 October 2009 (UTC)

Another factual comment about the unsigned comment above: Yes you're quite correct, Butcher is a verb with all the meanings that you mention. However it's also a noun, meaning a person (usually with a a stripey white overall!). So my point was that the person - the Butcher - has a shop, that shop is his/her shop and it's called a Butcher's Shop, complete with possessive apostrophe. Usually it's assumed that there is only one Butcher who has ownership of the shop and therefore it's referred to as a Butcher's Shop (or Butcher's for short). However if there are more than one Butchers in the shop, then to be grammaticaly correct it would then be known as the Butchers' Shop (or Butchers'). The possesive apostrophe, because you are now dealing with more than one Butcher, moves to the end of the word.

Possesive apostrophes are really very simple. If the word possesed is singular then 's, if the word is plural then s'. An exeption would be if the word is plural without ending in s, then the apostrophe remains within the word ('s). Examples: Butcher's Shop (one butcher); Butchers' Shop (more than one butcher); Children's Shop (plural of Child is Children - which is a plural which doesn't end with a s so the apostrophe is 's.

The hyperling that you referred to is talking about lots of butchers so Butchers' Shops is correct for that particular site, but not generally.World of departure (talk) 19:18, 2 October 2009 (UTC)

Unless there is more than one worker in the shop then it's Butchers' shopContributions/91.210.101.9 ([[User talk:|talk]]) 16:25, 6 October 2009 (UTC)

Let me point out that not everyone that works in a newsagents or butcher shop are newsagents or butchers. Unsigned

I am not sure in other places but in Australia, the wikipedia as it is now is quite correct. The person/people that manage the newsagent's part of the business are newsagent/newsagents. Generally they are the owners but always. The newsagency is the shop. IPWAI (talk) 07:26, 24 May 2012 (UTC)

USA?[edit]

Is this term used in the United States? Maurreen (talk) 22:39, 9 February 2010 (UTC)

Not as far as I am aware. I strongly question the subsuming of the American "newsstand" under this apparently British English heading. The UK "newsagent's shop" appears to be a considerably different animal. US newsstands, for example, rarely if ever (never, in my experience) sold cigarettes and were not a "shop" in the usual sense of the word; rather, as I am about to indicate in the article, they usually consisted of an array of periodicals and newspapers displayed in a substantial semi-permanent rack along the outer wall of a commercial building, sheltered from the elements only by a retractable awning and attended by a lone owner or employee equipped to accept payment and make change. AVarchaeologist (talk) 12:01, 3 February 2014 (UTC)