Talk:Night of the Long Knives

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Featured article Night of the Long Knives is a featured article; it (or a previous version of it) has been identified as one of the best articles produced by the Wikipedia community. Even so, if you can update or improve it, please do so.
Main Page trophy This article appeared on Wikipedia's Main Page as Today's featured article on October 9, 2007.
WikiProject Germany (Rated FA-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Germany, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Germany on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Featured article FA  This article has been rated as FA-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject Munich (marked as Top-importance).
 
WikiProject Politics (Rated FA-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Politics, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of politics on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Featured article FA  This article has been rated as FA-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Removing article from WikiProject LGBT studies[edit]

I removed the article from WikiProject LGBT studies because it is not related to LGBT at all. Some people might belive that Ernst Röhm was murdered because of his homosexuality, but this is wrong. See the following quotes from the article:

Adolf Hitler moved against the SA and its leader, Ernst Röhm, because he saw the independence of the SA and the penchant of its members for street violence as a direct threat to his newly gained political power.

While Röhm's homosexuality did not endear him to conservatives, they were more concerned about his political ambitions.

Sapere aude22 (talk) 09:26, 22 March 2012 (UTC)

I don't think a Wikipedia article can be used as a source for argumentation on Wikipedia. Whether he was murdered because of his homosexuality or not, it's a fact that his homosexuality and alleged orgies at Bad Wiessee were the key arguments used in propaganda as a justification for the murders. -- megA (talk) 14:43, 9 November 2013 (UTC)

Unsourced paragraph[edit]

The section that's titled "Reaction" concludes with the following paragraph:

German citizens also supported this Military operation carried out by the SS. The SA were very disorganised and in reality, were nothing but Nazi 'street thugs'. They often attacked communists ( Kommunistische Partei Deutschlands) and sometimes even civilians. The German people almost commended the elimination of this violent force. This also was due to the fact German law courts were quick to declare this legal. however obviously this action was clearly not fully legal. The Nazi party had not consulted the reichstag, thus the mass murder had not been reviewed by the Weirmar republic. Thus this action cannot be argued completely legal. However the Reichstag were all too happy to get rid of the German StormTrooper organisation. This meant this could be passed by German law courts immediately after the killing had taken place.

This paragraph was added on 8 November 2013‎ by 194.6.0.243.

(1) This paragraph contains no citations for the sweeping statements that it makes.
(2) This paragraph is almost incoherent.

  • It characterizes the Night of the Long Knives as a "Military operation". The German military did not commit any of the murders; indeed, the author himself states that it was an "operation carried out by the SS."
  • Furthermore, it states that "… this action was clearly not fully legal. The Nazi party had not consulted the reichstag … ." Consulting the Reichstag would not have given the government authority to commit mass murder.
  • It also states: "This meant this could be passed by German law courts immediately after the killing had taken place." What "could be passed by German law courts"? Consistent with what law?

(3) The author capitalizes words inconsistently: Military ; Reichstag and reichstag ; however ; etc.
(4) The statement that the SA "often attacked communists ( Kommunistische Partei Deutschlands) and sometimes even civilians" is redundant: the behavior of the SA is mentioned earlier in the article.

Delete this confused, unsubstantiated mess — unless someone wants to edit it and add citations. Cwkmail (talk) 16:16, 25 December 2013 (UTC)

Done per WP:BOLD.--Darius (talk) 21:39, 25 December 2013 (UTC)

1956 investigation[edit]

In the Wikipedia article on Michael Lippert, there is this paragraph:

"In 1956, the Munich authorities began an investigation into the Night of the Long Knives and in August arrested Lippert and Sepp Dietrich for their part in it. They were bailed, and the trial itself did not commence until 6 May 1957. They were represented by the lawyer Dr Alfred Seidl who had defended Rudolf Hess at the Nuremberg Trials. Lippert and Dietrich were charged with manslaughter, in Lippert's case for the death of Röhm. Lippert asserted that he had remained outside Röhm's cell, and only Theodor Eicke had gone in. On 10 May the case was summed-up and the prosecutor demanded a two-year sentence for Lippert. On 14 May the President of the Court found both Lippert and Dietrich guilty and sentenced both men to 18 months. He described Lippert as "filled with a dangerous and unrepentant fanaticism"."

Shouldn't there be something about this post-war investigation in _this_ article? 101.117.68.213 (talk) 04:39, 31 August 2014 (UTC)