Talk:Nine Herbs Charm

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Moved poem from article[edit]

Inclusion of this in its entirety was inappropriate to the article, but maybe useful in snippets -- or could be transwikied to another wikimedia site.

'''NINE  HERBS  CHARM'''
(needs work)
Remember, Mugwort, what you revealed, 
What you prepared at Regenmeld. 
Una, you are called, eldest of herbs. 
You avail against three and against thirty, 
You avail against poison and against infectious sickness, 
You avail against the loathsome fiend that wanders through the land. 

And you, Plantain, mother of herbs, 
Open from the east, mighty from within. 
Over you carts creaked, over you queens rode, 
Brides exclaimed over you, over you bulls gnashed 
their teeth. 
Yet all these you withstood and fought against: 
So may you poison and infectious sicknesses resist 
And the loathsome fiend that wanders through the land. 
Stime this herb is named; on stone it grew. 
It  stands against poison, 
it combats pain. 
Fierce it is called, 
it fights against venom, 
It  expels malicious [demons], 
it casts out venom. 
This  is the herb that 
fought against the snake, 
This avails against venom, 
it avails against infectious illnesses, 
It  avails against 
the loathsome fiend that wanders through the land. 

Fly now, Betonica, 
the less from the greater, 
The greater from the 
less, until there be a remedy for both. 

Remember, Camomile, what you revealed, 
What you brought about at Alorford: 
That he nevermore gave up 
the ghost because of ills infectious, 
Since Camomile into a drug for him was made. 
This  is the herb called Wergulu. 
The  seal sent this over the ocean's ridge 
To heal the horror of other poison. 

These nine 
fought against nine poisons: 
A snake came 
sneaking, 
it slew a man. 
Then Woden took nine thunderbolts 
And struck the serpent 
so that in nine parts it flew. 
There apple destroyed 
the serpent's poison: 
That it nevermore in house would dwell. 
Thyme and Fennel, an exceeding mighty t

So may you poison and infectious sicknesses resist 
And the loathsome fiend that wanders through the land. 
Stime this herb is named; on stone it grew. 
It  stands against poison, 
it combats pain. 
Fierce it is called, 
it fights against venom, 
It  expels malicious [demons], 
it casts out venom. 
This  is the herb that 
fought against 
the snake, 
This avails against venom, it avails against infectious illnesses, 
It  avails against the loathsome fiend that wanders through the land. 
Fly now, Betonica, 
the less from the greater, 
The greater from the 
less, until there be a remedy for both. 

Remember, Camomile, what you revealed, 
What you brought about at Alorford: 
That he nevermore gave up 
the ghost because of ills infectious, 
Since Camomile into a drug for him was made. 
This  is the herb called Wergulu. 
The  seal sent this over the ocean's ridge 
To heal the horror of other poison. 
These nine fought against nine poisons: 

A snake came sneaking, 
it slew a man. 
Then Woden took nine thunderbolts 
And struck the serpent 
so that in nine parts it flew. 

There apple destroyed 
the serpent's poison
That it nevermore in house would dwell. 
Thyme and Fennel, an exceeding mighty two, 
These herbs the wise Lord created, 
Holy in heaven, while hanging [on the cross]. 
He  laid and placed 
them in the seven worlds, 
As a help for the poor and the rich alike. 
It  stands against pain, 
it fights against poison, 
It  is potent against 
three and against thirty, 
Against a demon's hand, and against sudden guile, 
Against enchantment by vile creatures. 

Now  these nine herbs avail against nine accursèd spirits, 
Against nine poisons and against nine infectious ills, 
Against the red poison,against the running poison, 
Against the white poison, against 
the blue poison, 
Against the yellow poison,
against the green poison, 
Against the black poison,
against the blue poison, 
Against the brown poison,
against the scarlet poison, 
Against worm-blister, against water-blister</code>
<ref>Three Anglo-Saxon Charms from the "Lacnunga" Author(s): J. H. G. Grattan Source: The Modern Language Review, Vol. 22, No. 1 (Jan., 1927), pp. 1-6 Published by: Modern Humanities Research Association Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3714060</ref>
<ref>The Nine Herbs Author(s): Howard Meroney Source: Modern Language Notes, Vol. 59, No. 3 (Mar., 1944), pp. 157-160 Published by: The Johns Hopkins University Press Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2910867</ref>

--HidariMigi (talk) —Preceding undated comment added 02:39, 11 March 2011 (UTC).