Talk:Nishiarai Station

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Requested move[edit]

The "Nishi-Arai Station" article was moved back to "Nishiarai Station" recently leaving "Nishi-Arai Station" as a redirect, but I suggest that "Nishi-Arai" is more appropriate, since it follows the defacto standard format of hyphenating and capitalizing Japanese station names with a prefix such as "Nishi-" or "Shin-" etc. DAJF 03:29, 31 July 2007 (UTC)

Prefixes such as the cardinal directions are usually hyphenated in English if it's not really part of the name, but giving direction. Such as Akashi and Nishi-Akashi, here in the Kansai area. I don't know much about Tokyo since I don't live there and have only been a few times, but if the Nishi in this case is a part of the name, and not used to indicate location, then it shouldn't be hyphenated, I think. Shin is the same way, it's hyphenated when it's not part of the actual name of the place. Thanks. Hosikawafuzi 06:12, 2 August 2007 (UTC)
  • Oppose. Station signage does not use the hyphen in this case. Looking at 'Tokyo City Atlas' 3rd edition, ISBN 4-7700-2503-3 shows it used consistently without the hyphen and used as a prefix e.g. Nishiarai-Honchō. Alex Sims 11:41, 31 July 2007 (UTC)
  • Oppose as the general consensus is not necessarily to hyphenate, but rather to use the English signage as the basis for naming the articles. If the signs don't use a hyphen, we shouldn't either. ···日本穣? · Talk to Nihonjoe 07:53, 5 August 2007 (UTC)

Move request withdrawn[edit]

Based on the comments here, I now think the move is not such a good idea, and have withdrawn the request to move Nishiarai Station to Nishi-Arai Station. DAJF 07:02, 3 August 2007 (UTC)