Talk:Node (networking)

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The disambiguation page tell us, "Node, in information technology, a device connected to a network, such as a computer or router." Indeed. What more is there to say? Not much more than a paragraph-worth. But the same could also be said about nodes in linked lists: we define them, describe them, perhaps give some history, and we're done. What is essential and important is that node is a synonym for vertex, with its origins in its botanical sense, and that when we call something a node we are saying that we would like to deal with it abstractly as a point with arcs to other points. What is confusing is that this structure of nodes and links, often called a graph, is also often called a network, so Node (networking) suggests to me that what I will read is a discussion of applied graph theory.

Why must each sense have its own page? We can isolate the graph theoretic node, or just link to Graph (mathematics) after a cursory discussion of it. But nodes in botany, programming, and telecommunications would be better treated in one article than many, at least at first. Once they outgrow the page, they could split off, but as is this structure sprawling from the disambiguation page is overkill. - Jrn 23:56, 12 Oct 2004 (UTC), revised 05:23, 17 Oct 2004 (UTC)


A node is also related to sound...--74.140.140.245 (talk) 00:23, 18 November 2008 (UTC)

Here another, unrelated meaning is described. Andres 06:59, 7 May 2006 (UTC)


I took out the info on sound nodes and pasted it below. It should be either in a separate page on sound nodes or in a large page on various nodes, but nfwfwfwot on the computer node page.--Mikebrand 16:22, 15 May 2006 (UTC)

A node is also related to sound, as the acoustics within a room or area and where sound levels rise in clarity. Example: Positioning of speakers or mainly bass drivers, to give a drone free sound there for increasing the overall clarity. By placing the speakers or driver in these areas where the sound levels rise (naturel acoustical effects of the room). Can be done by placing a speaker/driver where the listener sits and walk around the room listening for the sound level to become "boom" free, i.e the sound levels rise. This is a "node" and this is the acousticaly the best place to position the speaker/driver. This effect is mostly more suited to base drivers on surround sound set ups.

About.com is wrong[edit]

About.com is referenced to source the claim that nodes are the same as hosts on a TCP/IP network. That claim I've never seen anywhere else and I believe it is wrong. All hosts are nodes, but not all nodes are hosts. Not even on IP-networks. Level 2 switches are also nodes.--itpastorn (talk) 09:26, 17 February 2008 (UTC)

Adding to my own statement. This source is almost word for word identical with the glossary in CCNA, and defines node in three ways: Letter N at Total Telecom Glossary. (CCNA has the first and last.) I will attempt (given time) to rewrite the article accordingly.--itpastorn (talk) 13:38, 17 February 2008 (UTC)

useful links and info[edit]

In preparation for my rewrite I am gathering useful info here:--itpastorn (talk) 15:09, 17 February 2008 (UTC)

We define nodes as hosts, routers, Ethernet switches, or any other device where the input and output links can have different characteristics.

—Defining Network Capacity (informational RFC), RFC 5136

any device that is directly connected to the network, usually through Ethernet cable; nodes include file servers and shared peripherals.

—Sunrise Computer Glossary, [www.sunrise.uk.com/glossary.html

In a communications system, a node is a network junction or connection point. Every terminal, computer, hub and switch is a node

—PC Mag: Definition of: node - that includes hubs (sic!)

There are many additional meanings on the PC mag site. I am unsure if WP covers them all (such as nodes on cluster).--itpastorn (talk) 15:09, 17 February 2008 (UTC)

Merger[edit]

  • I agree. Merge!--itpastorn (talk) 15:55, 24 February 2008 (UTC)
  • Me too. :) Actually I suggested it. Mange01 (talk) 21:48, 25 February 2008 (UTC)
  • No Merging this with telecommunication may not be appropriate. Network nodes can be independent of telecommunication ones. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Srinivasbt (talkcontribs) 11:38, 14 March 2008 (UTC)