Talk:Northeastern Mandarin

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This article contains no references, and is internally inconsistent. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 208.113.249.107 (talk) 06:20, 8 August 2009 (UTC)



The graph showing Dungan at the same level as "Jin" and "Bei" is wrong. Dungan is the term used by Turkic speaking Central Asian to Mandarin-speaking Muslim immigrants from China's Shaanxi and Gansu provinces. There are two distinct accents, one is based in Shaanxi hence is a dialect of Zhongyuan Mandarin, and the second one is based on Gansu dialect which is Northwestern Mandarin.

Karolus 2010/3/9 —Preceding unsigned comment added by 218.103.134.80 (talk) 18:28, 8 March 2010 (UTC)

Similarity to Beijing Mandarin[edit]

Can't explain it in full detail, but the way I would word the paragraph is:

One hypothesis for the similarities tells that the Manchus originally adopted Mandarin as a court language along with their native Manchu prior to the Qing conquest of the Ming dynasty, and this created their own dialect of Mandarin, and as the Ming-Qing Transition overturned the government in Beijing in 1644, hundreds of thousands of Manchu people - the northeastern ethnic group of the new ruling family - moved into the Chinese capital. They would become over 30% of the city's population, bringing their version of Mandarin to Beijing as the standard.

But firstly I need a source, but anyway the current version will confuse readers. The Qing dynasty most certainly did adopt Mandarin before they managed to conquer the Ming dynasty, Nurhaci and Hong Taiji employed thousands of Han at their capital in Shenyang/Mukden. It was there that they formed their own distinctive dialect before invading Beijing..Rajmaan (talk) 21:20, 27 February 2013 (UTC)