Talk:Northern Thailand

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Provinces also in the north[edit]


Pawyilee (talk)

The above provinces are grouped in the North in the four-region system. The six-region system is used in most academic settings, especially geography.
I also removed the following paragraphs from the article, since without context they seem more likely to confuse the reader. I think they would be more appropriate in other articles, or they could be reworded and added here after this article is expanded to include enough context. --Paul_012 (talk) 18:03, 5 November 2011 (UTC)

The history of Northern Thailand is dominated by the Lanna kingdom, which was founded in 1259 and remained an independent force until the 16th century. Their version of the lunisolar Buddhist calendar ran two months ahead of what is now the modern Thai lunar calendar; this is reflected in their version of Thailand's Loy Krathong festival, which occurs in Thailand's Lunar Month 12, but in the former lands of Lanna is the Lantern Festival of Yee Peng, Lunar Month 2.

In 2000, Northern Thailand banned caffeine to thwart methamphetamine production.[1]

  1. ^ Thailand bans caffeine – Thailand – Salon.com