Talk:Note (typography)

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Explanatory Notes[edit]

Does anyone know how to add short Explanatory Notes as numbered footnotes in Wikipedia? If so, please leave a link or directions on my talk page. Thank you.Shannon bohle (talk) 05:06, 17 November 2007 (UTC)

Footnotes and Reference Marks[edit]

I only see two pages devoted to Footnotes and Reference Marks in the U.S. Government Printing Office Style Manual (pdf). The rest of that section deals with Indexes and Tables of Contents, and Outlines. The sixth page is blank. --152.105.129.9 18:59, 7 December 2005 (UTC)

We need a name for the subscript character used in footnotes.[edit]

The name for the text at bottom of the page is called the "footnote." The name of the character that refers to that footnote is called the what? How about "headmark" or "notemark" or something like that? There really should be a name for this thing.

I've been using "notemark" for the better part of the last decade.
Oxford University Press used "reference markers" (see 37th ed of Hart's Rules for Compositors and Readers (1967) - the latest in libraries to which I currently have access.) I live in the UK, and have been accustomed in 40 years of dealing with print as a teacher to call them 'footnote markers'. This seems unambiguous to me, particularly if we distinguish between 'text footnote markers' and 'footnote markers at the foot'.MacAuslan 07:42, 29 September 2006 (UTC)

"reference figures" is what the government page calls the number or asterick used in a footnote.

Isn't it a "superscript"? And does this article actually cite Al Franken as a source?! Schnaz 20:34, 27 March 2006 (UTC)

I agree that it's superscript (Lat super = above).MacAuslan 07:42, 29 September 2006 (UTC)

How about: dex. Ex: What was the dex on the footnote. Tom Marquette Footnote podcast

Copy and Paste[edit]

The "Academic usage" section of the article has been lifted verbatim from the NASA History Style Guide referenced earlier in the article. I'm a bit new to Wikipedia; as far as I understand verbatim copying is not permitted, right? -SoulSkorpion 07:59, 23 April 2006 (UTC)


I've re-wrote this section to fix the errors as well as the plagiarism. It should be correct and original now. Rutherford B. Hayes 17:23, 9 February 2007 (UTC)

Ann Coulter swipe[edit]

Could the Franken-Coulter sentence be a NPOV swipe at Coulter? I believe that this could be better written. TuckerResearch 05:17, 29 August 2006 (UTC)

Before or after[edit]

I'm sure I could find it somewhere but I think it would take quite a while to find it does the footnote go before or after the punctuation mark. For example should it go like: [1]. or .[1]. Thanks SirGrant 01:22, 11 September 2006 (UTC)

I much prefer the superscript or notemark -- whatever we call it -- to go after the ending punctuation. (Although, I must admit, it seems a bit trivial.) -- Schnaz 21:38, 12 September 2006 (UTC)
I had an amiable disagreement with a Lecturer in History once who agreed with you, Schnaz. He said that he had never seen otherwise in History books. Since then, I have observed that this is so, and I have to admit that he was right - but I still feel that in logic it should go before. Consistency is much to be desired; and if there is a high consistency among other users, one should probably go with the flow. Alas! MacAuslan 07:42, 29 September 2006 (UTC)

Asimov used footnote in novel[edit]

In Murder at The ABA Asimov used footnotes. Please add this information to the fiction section of this article. Thank you. Jane Foxx 22:46, 24 March 2007 (UTC)

HG2G[edit]

How about adding the instance in Douglas Adams's Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy? There's a pretty long footnote there about Ford's real name. Bob the Wikipedian, the Tree of Life WikiDragon (talk) 23:05, 26 April 2008 (UTC)

Footnotes and endnotes[edit]

The current title of the article implies that footnotes is the common term and that "endnotes" is merely a variant. The common term for footnotes and endnotes, though, is simply "notes". So unless we are to keep separate articles on both terms, the current title is slightly misleading and doesn't seem entirely neutral. Are there any reasons for not moving the article to, say, note (annotation)?

Peter Isotalo 13:51, 22 May 2010 (UTC)

Since there had been no critical response to my comment above I moved the article to a title that more accurately reflects the article topic, ei a typographical issue. I thought that note (typography) would be better title, though, since "annotation" could be interpreted as referring too specifically to commentary notes. Any alternative suggestions are more than welcome.
Peter Isotalo 14:36, 28 July 2010 (UTC)

foot and note disease[edit]

The reference for "foot and note disease" only mentions the phrase in passing. It does not examine the phrase in detail or depth. A better reference is needed. Here's what the text says:

Mr. Hastings has tried thoughout his study

everything that I have put down here is no 'to keep away from what John Betjeman calls more than an alternative way of observing "the rash of foot and note disease" that most the future at all events. It remains one biographical accounts tender'. Fair enough, if one's a dramatist, to throw overboard the

scholars with the critics.

41.204.77.50 (talk) 09:22, 9 March 2012 (UTC)


That quotation is irredeemably scrambled. Just try to read it through, and you'll see that it makes no sense and can't even be parsed.
The source text is in short lines, each of which is a plausible chunk when taken by itself. The anonymous poster plainly didn't realize that Wiki rendering ignores line breaks except in wikilists and <pre> text. They had probably copied it carelessly from two columns in a PDF, with the quotation in one column and something else in the other.
I haven't been able to find the original on-line, but this reconstruction seems plausible:
intended quotation       extraneous
Mr. Hastings has tried thoughout his study       everything that I have put down here is no
'to keep away from what John Betjeman calls       more than an alternative way of observing
"the rash of foot and note disease" that most       the future at all events. It remains one
biographical accounts tender'. Fair enough, if      
one's a dramatist, to throw overboard the      
scholars with the critics.      
But after all that, a quick Google search shows several sources using the expression, with or without attribution. I've added the attribution to Betjeman, referencing an interview with his daughter.
--Thnidu (talk) 03:02, 10 July 2013 (UTC)

Sidenotes/Margin Notes[edit]

Sidenotes or marhin notes are an attractive and easy-to-read method for inserting additional information. I have seen them used often in the academic humanities, for example this journal (http://www.field-journal.org/). — Preceding unsigned comment added by 87.224.68.168 (talk) 16:37, 19 October 2012 (UTC)

Duplicate sections[edit]

The sections

  • Explanatory Notes
  • Footnotes and Reference Marks
  • We need a name for the subscript character used in footnotes.
  • Copy and Paste
  • Ann Coulter swipe
  • Before or after

were duplicated en bloc, from Revision as of 12:24, 25 February 2008 to Revision as of 12:25, 25 February 2008. I've removed the second set. --Thnidu (talk) 02:24, 10 July 2013 (UTC)

[edit]

Isn't '※' the logo of the Bank of Scotland? Is this just a random coincidence? 88.104.254.106 (talk) 19:59, 5 November 2013 (UTC)