Talk:Nuclear disarmament

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I deleted a bunch of stuff[edit]

I deleted a bunch of stuff about Silent Echo. Just factually incorrect (such as stating that George H.W. Bush was President in July 1993... Clinton was inaugerated in January of 93. CP Guy

There seems to be a lot of sweeping statements in the history section. In particular:

  • Campaign growing in strength, then fading (how do we know? what's the measure?)
  • Dissidence in the USSR (how do we know there were no public voices?) How do we know Sakharov had little effect?

Maybe somewhat unavoidable in making a sweep of history, but some basis would be good. Kingsindian 18:53, 30 November 2007 (UTC)

I agree with you on the paragraph in the introduction about the USSR. It reads like a slightly nationalistic American high school history paper. No sources, and sweeping POV generalizations. Andre Sakharov had little effect? Mikhail Gorbachev had little effect?--Nbauman (talk) 12:40, 11 July 2011 (UTC)

"US nuclear policy" section[edit]

I made some grammatical fixes in this section, but someone more knowledgeable than I needs to flesh it out. I'm all for disarmament, but it's not obvious that figuring out strategic uses for the existing nuclear arsenal contradicts a policy of decreasing the total number of weapons. I think it's an important part of the story, but there needs to be much more evidence. Also, someone should add something about Bush's recent announcement that the U.S. would be cutting the arsenal significantly -- not only as an important fact, but to show that the Bush line on nuclear weapons is a little more complicated than it's presented to be. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Albnelson (talkcontribs) 01:31, 8 January 2008 (UTC)


I agree with most of the statements in the U.S. nuclear policy section on a personal, ideological level; however, they're really POV...I've tagged them as such. These need to be revised so as to be compatible with WP:NPOV.Katana0182 (talk) 04:05, 7 June 2008 (UTC)

I think the whole US Policy section may need to be scrapped, until and unless someone is willing to rewrite it. As it stands, it reads much more like a stump speech than an encyclopedia entry. I'll wait a week or so, and then edit it down to bare essentials if no one else is capable of doing a more thorough job in the meantime. CelestialRender (talk) 14:53, 30 July 2008 (UTC)

I agree. The section is useless. It would be useful to have section on nuclear disarmament steps and policies of each of the five recognized nuclear weapon states, the four additional states declared or believed to have nuclear weapons, and two relevant alliances (NATO and the CIS). Something on nuclear weapon free zones (at least a cross-reference) would be useful too. NPguy (talk) 02:43, 31 July 2008 (UTC)

See here[edit]

The sentence near the beginning of this article is absurd: "deterrence, which, through the possession and threatened use of nuclear weapons, has kept the world free of nuclear war since 1945."

This is totally confused. You can't say that nuclear weapons had a part to play in keeping the world free of nuclear war - don't you see this is absurd? You may say that nuclear weapons had a place in keeping the world free of MAJOR war, but not nuclear war, for without the nuclear weapons the world would have been free of nuclear war because there wouldn't have been any weapons to fight it with anyway. You are effectively saying that the very existence of nuclear weapons saved us from the perils presented by the existence of nuclear weapons. What you must say instead is that the deterrent effect of nuclear weapons, due to their highly destructive nature, prevented the outbreak of major war on the scale of WWI or WWII. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 128.86.148.165 (talk) 09:03, 22 March 2009 (UTC)

Arguments[edit]

It seems that this article has neither arguments for nuclear disarmement, nor aginst nuclear disarmements; also 1 particular argument isn't described anywhere: that nuclear weapons stockpile allot of nuclear energy that could otherwise be put to good use

Usable nuclear energy in ICBM.png

—Preceding unsigned comment added by 91.182.95.46 (talk) 14:43, 7 October 2010 (UTC)

It seems that LOGIC can now be employed ... to show without a doubt that nuclear arms are now not needed anymore. It can be shown logically. This is the first step to put down the argument. Likely, the argument has been written somewhere as there are many people who now know ... by LOGIC, we mean that arguments can be formed that comply with the rules of logic. Symbolic logic spells it out for us very specifically. We can follow the logic with symbolic logic. This logic trail even dispels the deterrence argument.MissouriRick (talk) 11:32, 27 May 2011 (UTC)


Kenneth Waltz and Stability–instability paradox references removed, why?[edit]

Kenneth Waltz and the references provided should not have been deleted from the article page.

Remember, you do not censor the views of experts on wikipedia simply because you do not agree with them.

Thank you.

The views of Kenneth Waltz are relevant to this article. Waltz believes that nuclear proliferation is good because deterrence promotes stability. This position should be labeled as contrarian - a seriously argued viewpoint that is not widely shared. The reason for my deletion was that the cited article was on the narrow issue of Iran's nuclear program and did not support the broader description of Waltz's views. Find a better source and paraphrase it properly and it should be OK. The stability-instability paradox, by contrast, appears to be a fairly minor viewpoint. The wikipedia article is a stub with a single citation. NPguy (talk) 19:38, 26 August 2012 (UTC)

Technically?[edit]

How it can be done technically? What are the results and outcomes of the possible technical process[es]? I think, this would be an important subtopic for such an encyclopaedia article, more important than guesswork about people's opinions. - 91.122.13.129 (talk) 22:00, 25 October 2013 (UTC)

request edit[edit]


i am requesting the creation of a page or article or what you call it. i am a credible source. i was a participant . also many other witness accounts will confirm my text as true. i also have linked some media sources that i have found on the internet. i do not have the skill. the article is well verified . please create it for me and others who walked. the world peace march sources for world peace march 1981-82

https://archive.org/details/KxprArchive-SacramentoSpectrumWorldPeaceMarch http://www.angelfire.com/on/GEAR2000/WPM82DC1.html http://wagingnonviolence.org/2009/06/remembering-the-1982-rally-against-nuclear-arms/ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pBQjYLQHhVY https://www.facebook.com/notes/marty-smith/disarament-has-been-a-movement-since-arms/637988282940624 http://books.google.ca/books?id=CbFmB0wRaacC&pg=PA15&lpg=PA15&dq=%27%27the+world+peace+march+1981,San+Francisco+%22&source=bl&ots=tjlS7Vlhwe&sig=92D5M3Mva9GgzLsv2Rpg2KTrXx0&hl=en&sa=X&ei=GdctU9LbDMGRqgH48YDQDw&ved=0CDMQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&q=%27%27the%20world%20peace%20march%201981%2CSan%20Francisco%20%22&f=false

http://www.angelfire.com/on/GEAR2000/SBstupa82.html \

http://www.nytimes.com/movies/movie/431418/The-World-Peace-March/overview Nichidatsu Fujii's message at the beginning of a peace walk, http://www.angelfire.com/on/GEAR2000/Fujii2.pdf page 49 https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/sun-reach/conversations/topics/60

in 1981,Nichidatsu Fujii, dispatched his followers to march and chant around the globe in support of the U.N. 2nd. special session for disarmament. In the U.S.A. marchers began in New Orleans, San Diego, and San Francisco, in Canada marchers began in Montreal and Toronto. The San Fransisco March began on Oct. 21, 1981 with a ceremony on Alcatraz. 13 marchers, being Buddhist followers of Nipponzan-Myōhōji, Native Americans, U.S. and German citizens, began the S.F. march. marching about 20 mile per day they were hosted each night by community groups in every town and on Native reservations. many mayors and town councils made proclamations and such honoring the the peace and disarmament marchers. over the course of the march citizens were moved to join. By the time they arrived in Chicago the S.F. marchers numbered about 30. in may of '82 the group of about 40 marchers from Toronto Ont. joined the S.F. group in Buffalo N.Y. at the International Peace Bridge doubling the size of the group. thru the state of N.Y. 10 to 20 people joined the march daily.when the S.F. group walked across the George Washington Bridge they numbered about 300. the groups on other march routs also grew over the 7 months. on June 12, 1982, In Central Park Nipponzan-Myōhōji marchers from the U.S.A., Europe, Africa, and Asia, joined with mobilization for survival organizers and religious and peace groups from around the world in a peaceful demonstration for disarmament of many million people.


Nichidatsu Fujii (藤井 日達 Fujii Nichidatsu?, 1885–1985) was a Japanese Buddhist monk, and founder of the Nipponzan-Myōhōji order of Buddhism.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nichidatsu_Fujii

i supplied credible references for the additions i requested concerning Nipponsan myohoji, and the world peace march in 1982 yesterday. what is with you people martin smith Marchers for World Peace come to Iowa City By Nancy Lonergan Staff Writer

http://dailyiowan.lib.uiowa.edu/DI/1982/di1982-02-26.pdf — Preceding unsigned comment added by 174.91.156.200 (talk) 18:36, 23 March 2014 (UTC)

Not done: it's not clear what changes you want made. Please mention the specific changes in a "change X to Y" format. Sam Sailor Sing 21:14, 23 March 2014 (UTC)
I'm the one who reverted this addition. It was not a question of lacking reliable sources. Rather, I reverted on grounds of undue weight on a seemingly minor set of events. Another objection would be that these events were not particularly notewrothy. If you think these events were noteworthy, I might change my view if you presented evidence of their impact. NPguy (talk) 19:41, 24 March 2014 (UTC)


NPguy it may be noteworthy to the hundreds of people who organized the WORLD PEACE MARCH. also it is a noteworthy project in that it was initiated by Nichidatsu Fujii (藤井 日達 Fujii Nichidatsu?, 1885–1985) was a Japanese Buddhist monk, and founder of the Nipponzan-Myōhōji order of Buddhism.

i would be pleased to write and rewrite the text according to your suggestions.. however others would consider the events noteworthy.

events in April of 1981 at the end of the Worldwide Assembly of Religious Peaceworkers for General and Nuclear Disarmament Nichidatsu Fujii initiated the WORLD PEACE MARCH to support the U.N.second special session for disarmament. the WORLD PEACE MARCH circled the globe. in N.America Marches began in San Francisco, L.A. New Orleans, Bangor Main, Montreal, and Toronto . all the peace marches convened on June 7 1982 in N. Y. C., and participated in the great demonstration in Central Park

marty smith — Preceding unsigned comment added by 174.91.156.200 (talk) 22:57, 24 March 2014 (UTC)

I've read the WP guidelines again and found that notability does not apply to the content of an article, only to the article as a whole. So this peace march may not deserve an article of its own (unless you can find additional sources that attest to its significance) but is fair game for including in this article. The other WP guideline on not giving undue weight refers to opinions, not events. So it appears that neither one argues against including this event in this article.
At the same time, the small numbers of participants cited (from 13 to 300) leads me to question the significance of this event. A reader could conclude that the disarmament movement was extremely weak and insignificant at that time, as it attracted so few people. This is far fewer than during the "ban the bomb" movement of the 1950s and early 1960s or the U.S. "nuclear freeze" and the parallel European campaign for nuclear disarmament movement of the 1980s. My question would be: Does this march deserve mention on a par with a demonstration that attracted an estimated 1 million people in Central Park at around the same time? NPguy (talk) 14:39, 25 March 2014 (UTC)

for NPguy by MHS perhaps the facts about how Nichidatsu Fujii addressed the religious conference in April 81 and sent his monks to lead marches around the globe to generate global support for the U.N. II SS for disarmament. . Nipponzan-Myōhōji monks began marches in many European cities and in N. America.The marchers garnered support for the UN Talks from ordinary citizens in every town and village they visited.

there are details about how the demonstration in Central Parks became the largest demonstration in history that need to be brought into this article. there were demonstrations of tens of thousands of people in many cities (world wide) preceding the disarmament session.

it is not only 300 marchers. that is the story of the SF group (of which I was a member.) every march in Europe and N.A. grew likewise. if you are able to add some of these details the picture of the events in central park carry more significance. thank you marty — Preceding unsigned comment added by 174.91.156.200 (talk) 12:43, 26 March 2014 (UTC)

Could you write a concise description of these events? Perhaps a sentence on the origin/purpose, and a sentence on the scope and outcome. Also bear in mind the main article History of the anti-nuclear movement, where you can add further detail. NPguy (talk) 15:23, 26 March 2014 (UTC)


NPguy,

i have a signature now and i will request some additions on a new section, (if i figured that part out yet). is it ok to use text from a book or a newspaper ?

Marty h smith (talk) 15:30, 27 March 2014 (UTC)


why is this text disappearing?

on April 22 1981,Nichidatsu Fujii, addressed the Opening Plenary Session of The World Assembly of Religious Workers in Tokyo. There he announced The World Peace March to march and chant around the globe in support of the U.N. 2nd. special session for disarmament.The Buddhists and their American supporters, walked to New York from California, Louisiana, Canada and Maine.

On June 12, 1982, Nipponzan-Myōhōji marchers from the U.S.A., Europe, Africa, and Asia, joined with mobilization for survival organizers and religious and peace groups from around the world in Central Park Marty h smith (talk) 17:06, 27 March 2014 (UTC)

the world peace march[edit]

i suggest this text be included in the section named Nuclear disarmament movement, just before the entry

On June 12, 1982,


on April 22 1981,Nichidatsu Fujii, addressed the Opening Plenary Session</ref>https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/sun-reach/conversations/topics/60[1]By Donna GAIL Broussard,http://www.thecrimson.com/article/1982/4/30/world-peace-march-members-welcomed-by/[2]

  1. ^ of The World Assembly of Religious Workers in Tokyo
  2. ^ , where he announced the world peace march to march and chant around the globe in support of the U.N. 2nd. special session for disarmament. The Buddhists and their American supporters, walked to New York from California, Louisiana, Canada and Maine. on June 12, 1982, Nipponzan-Myōhōji marchers from the U.S.A., Europe, Africa, and Asia, joined with mobilization for survival organizers and religious and peace groups from around the world in Central Park. Marty h smith (talk) 16:32, 27 March 2014 (UTC) i can't see some of the text. i may not be placing the references correctly??? ~~~~ on April 22 1981,Nichidatsu Fujii, addressed the Opening Plenary Session of The World Assembly of Religious Workers in Tokyo. There he announced The World Peace March to march and chant around the globe in support of the U.N. 2nd. special session for disarmament.The Buddhists and their American supporters, walked to New York from California, Louisiana, Canada and Maine. On June 12, 1982, Nipponzan-Myōhōji marchers from the U.S.A., Europe, Africa, and Asia, joined with mobilization for survival organizers and religious and peace groups from around the world in Central Park ~~~~