Talk:Oceanus

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Greece (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Greece, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Greece on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Classical Greece and Rome (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is part of the WikiProject for Classical Greece and Rome, a group of contributors who write Wikipedia's Classics articles. If you would like to join the WikiProject or learn how to contribute, please see our project page. If you need assistance from a classicist, please see our talk page.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Mythology (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is supported by WikiProject Mythology. This project provides a central approach to Mythology-related subjects on Wikipedia. Please participate by editing the article, and help us assess and improve articles to good and 1.0 standards, or visit the WikiProject page for more details.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Father of the Gods[edit]

It seems that Oceanus was considered to be the original source of all the gods by many.

My evidence for this is Homer himself:

"I [Hera] am going to the ends of the generous earth, on a visit to Okeanos, whence the gods have come, and Tethys our mother, who brought me up kindly in their own house, and cared for me. I shall go to visit these, and resolve their division of discord, since now for a long time they have stayed apart from each other and from the bed of love, since rancour has entered their feelings." - Homer, Iliad 14.300

Any other one of the gods, whose race is immortal, I [Hypnos] would lightly put to sleep, even the stream of that River Okeanos, whence is risen the seed of all the immortals." - Homer, Iliad 14.244

"Okeanos I call, whose nature ever flows, from whom at first both Gods and men arose." - Orphic Hymn 83 to Oceanus

Also there is evidence outside Homer:

"Okeanos I call, whose nature ever flows, from whom at first both Gods and men arose." - Orphic Hymn 83 to Oceanus

It is clear that many veiwed Oceanus as the source of the gods. I think that this is an importan aspect of the character of Oceanus. Just because this myth was ognored by Hesiod does not mean that we should ignore it. I think that this is important enough and relevant enough to be included in the article.

The Prime Source 21:03, 29 April 2007 (UTC)Dale

"Okeanos Potamos": what a muddle[edit]

Removed the following here:

  • "Okeanos Potamos as the lower Danube from ancient literary perspectives:

Part of the Danubius or Istros river was also known as (together with the Black Sea) the Okeanos in ancient times, the lower Danube being called the Okeanos Potamos (Okeanos River)." No, the "Ocean Stream" encircles the world.

  • "Okeanos was not originally a Greek word (Thalassa being Greek for sea), Okeanos being a Pelasgian word which was similar to eye (ochio) and water (aqua) with the Pelasgian ending an-os, which could have meant large still water (not a sea). The lower Danube has a slow deep wide course, so it can be seen why it was considered as part of the Okeanos." 'No, 'thalassa is the word with the non-Greek etymology and -os is a Greek suffix. The remainder is also incorrect or a personal essay.
  • "Strabo mentions that Okeanos was once an immense lake (Geogr. I. 3. 4)" No, read Strabo, 1.3.4: there is no mention of Oceanus in the interesting discuission of seas gone dry etc.
  • "...and that the Argonauts sailed to the land rich in gold (Colchis, on the Black Sea) that was considered as another Okeanos (Geogr. I. 2. 10)." No, Strabo mentions the site of Colchis as "out by Oceanus", that is at the edge of the world. The Black Sea (Pontos, not Okeanos) is not intended here.
  • "Both Homer (Odyssey, XII. 1) and Hesiod (Theogonia, v.242. 959) in their theogonic legends exclusively refer to the lower Danube as the Okeanos Potamos, possibly due to it being remembered as the remnant of when the Pannonian and lower Danubian basins were under water. This may well reconcile why the dwellings of the Hyperboreans were near the Okeanos according to Hecateus of Abdera, while according to Pindar they were near the Istros or lower Danube (Olymp. III. 17)." No, Okeanos Potamos is the "Ocean Stream" that girdles the world. A naive reading of the geographical fudging of Apollonius of Rhodes may be the source of these confusions, which we mayn't pass on to the wikipedia reader.--Wetman (talk) 20:27, 9 January 2009 (UTC)

New section and Trevi Fountain[edit]

I took some text out of the introduction and made a section called "Excerpts from Hesiod and Homer".

The text says "In most variations of the war between the Titans and the Olympians, or Titanomachy, Oceanus, along with Prometheus and Themis, did not take the side of his fellow Titans against the Olympians, but instead withdrew from the conflict. In most variations of this myth, Oceanus also refused to side with Cronus in the latter's revolt against their father, Uranus." Which variations? Sources are needed here.

I know it's clear but I think it would be worth adding some information on art, particularly on Oceanus being the main character in the Trevi Fountain.

ICE77 (talk) 04:27, 15 April 2011 (UTC)