Talk:Ohio River

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edit·history·watch·refresh Stock post message.svg To-do list for Ohio River:

The Ohio River does not "regularly freeze over" in Louiville or even Cincinnati[edit]

The article is factually inaccurate in stating: " In winter it regularly freezes over at Louisville, Cincinnati, and Pittsburgh. Yet at Paducah, Kentucky in the south, near the Ohio’s confluence with the Mississippi, it is ice free year round. Paducah was founded there because it is the northernmost ice-free reach of the Ohio.". I have lived near the Ohio River for most of my life and have only seen it freeze over once and it was a BIG deal/news event, but don't take my word for it, here are some links: [[1]] [[2]] [[3]] [[4]] [[5]] I have taken the liberty to remove Louisville and Cincinnati from the sentence. I truly don't care to start an editing war and am thinking that maybe this statement may have been true at the time Paducah, KY was founded (possibly due to being before the Ohio River was dammed or a colder climate then or both, either way it is not factual today). I left the following statement about Paducah unedited (except for striking "Yet") because it states "ice free" and "not frozen over", (there is a big difference): "Yet at Paducah, Kentucky in the south, near the Ohio’s confluence with the Mississippi, it is ice free year round. Paducah was founded there because it is the northernmost ice-free reach of the Ohio". I did find it interesting that there is no mention of this proposed "fact" in Wikipedia's Paducah, Kentucky article. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.133.43.115 (talk) 04:15, 1 February 2011 (UTC)

Volume of water[edit]

The Ohio's volume of water is a questonable claim. The Missouri River is usually larger, and at times (depending on weather) the Tennessee River is also larger. Lou I 16:20, 9 Dec 2003 (UTC)

In fact, the statement about the Ohio River having more discharge (volume of water per second) than the Missouri River is entirely correct, as a general rule. The Ohio River drains a large, very humid region and as a result carries more water. The US Corps of Engineers maintains a very extensive system of dams on the Ohio River. The Corps and US Geological Survey carefully measure flow in the Ohio River. Otherwise, maintaining stable water surfaces would be impossible.

You can check out flow at any given moment for rivers that are monitored at: http://water.usgs.gov/

Select Real-Time Data. You can search for specific rivers and streams or... you can also click on the map in the upper right corner at http://water.usgs.gov/ and see the conditions of rivers throughout the United States. DirtBoy 18:18, 29 April 2006 (UTC)

Geological age of river[edit]

age of ohio river[edit]

Studies by Dr. Darryl Granger of Purdue University have very convincingly shown that the Ohio River formed at or slightly prior to 3 million years. Further development continued for 100s of thousands of years.

what is the age of the Ohio River?[edit]

It is 2.5 to 3 million years old.

what is the age of the Ohio River?[edit]

If no one is answering, it's probably because no one who has seen this knows the answer. Try Wikipedia:Reference desk. -[[User:Aranel|Aranel ("Sarah")]] 01:22, 23 Nov 2004 (UTC)

Erosion[edit]

is there any erosion problems?[edit]

No more than any other large river. Some areas have a major problem and others are essentially stable. One area strongly affected by erosion is in southeast Ohio where a tragic barge accident temporily(sp?) disabled a dam in early 2005. Water levels fell quickly and without the river pushing back, the water-pressurized banks began collapsing for large distances upstream.

Bridge Picture[edit]

The bridge in the picture is not the US Grant Bridge. It is, in fact, the Carl D. Perkins Bridge, located about a mile from the Grant Bridge. The new Grant Bridge has not been completed.

http://en.structurae.de/structures/data/index.cfm?ID=s0004785üÜöÖÙùÒÓʋĊ

Dblevins2 30 June 2005 03:54 (UTC)

where is the ohio river

Map[edit]

Please include a color map of the whole Ohio River

I added one Kmusser 15:25, 21 June 2006 (UTC)

Apr 2007 edits[edit]

Since an anon keeps restoring it, I'll say that I believe this statement to be incorrect: "The Ohio River is the second largest river in North America, the 6th largest in the Western Hemisphere, and the 12th largest river in world." When I deleted it, I also changed the discharge figure in the infobox using a cited source -- the previous figure was not cited, and was larger than the discharge figure presently on the Mississippi River page, which makes no sense. Please respond here if anyone disagrees. Thanks --Female peasant 16:03, 5 April 2007 (UTC)

The Ohio River is larger than the Mississippi where the two meet, plus much of the Mississippi discharges into wetlands in LA & MS before entering the ocean, whereas the Ohio flows through harder soils and has very few wetlands. The discharge figures are from the Army Cores page, which is given in real time. It is a tributary of the Mississippi in name only, if the naming had taken place in modern times, everything below Cairo would be called the Ohio River because it is the larger of the two rivers at the confluence.

Usually when talking about rivers "largest" refers to length not width. If named today everything below St. Louis would be called the Missouri River. Discharge figures should ideally be annual averages, using a real-time value now when flows are at their highest is going to be an inflated value compared to other rivers. Kmusser 20:26, 5 April 2007 (UTC)

Crytids?[edit]

I realize that it is kind of odd but I am wondering if there are any cryptids (monsters or strange out-of-place animals) associated with the Ohio River. There have definitely been reliable reports of alligators and Bull sharks caught in the Ohio River, any info on stuff like this out there? It would be interesting if there was at least a separate but linked article on Ohio River Cryptids. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 4.224.3.238 (talk) 07:36, 19 January 2009 (UTC)

Removed References to Ripley[edit]

There were several sentences that went into detail about one author and what she wrote about slavery around Ripley. The several sentences were poorly written and had no bearing on the river itself so I removed them.Tempestswordsman (talk) 17:12, 27 April 2009 (UTC)

Indian Territory?[edit]

The second paragraph of this article begins: "The river had great significance in the history of the Native Americans, and served, at times, as a border between Kentucky and Indian Territories." Perhaps, Indiana Territory is meant here? Jmdeur (talk) 11:57, 10 September 2009 (UTC)

Almost certainly. Kmusser (talk) 12:48, 10 September 2009 (UTC)

As a metaphor for the Jordan?[edit]

One version of the slave song "Michael row the boat ashore" contains the lines:

River Jordan is deep and wide

Milk and honey on the other side

This has been cited as a metaphor for death but I always understood this as referring to the Ohio River, which is deep and wide, unlike the Jordan, and which was the boundary between slavery and freedom. Can anybody find a source for this interpretation? —Preceding unsigned comment added by Northfold (talkcontribs) 12:23, 10 January 2010 (UTC)

A source if there is one for this reading would likely be in a discussion of slavery-era spirituals and the Underground Railroad. The symbolism, obviously, being that of coming out of bondage in Egypt and into the Promised Land. Before the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, crossing the Ohio River brought one to freedom. Later, the Underground Railroad would be extended northward to Ontario, Canada. 74.83.14.59 (talk) 19:37, 15 August 2011 (UTC)

volume[edit]

Is it true that the Ohio's volume is actually larger than the Mississippi's (just before the confluence)? I'd heard that but didn't know if it was true... --84.138.242.234 (talk) 13:02, 31 January 2010 (UTC)

Yes.74.83.14.59 (talk) 19:38, 15 August 2011 (UTC)