Talk:Omega-3 fatty acid

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Mayo Clinic[edit]

This might be helpful:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/fish-oil/NS_patient-fishoil/DSECTION=evidence

Prickly pears, radishes and raw broccoli have some according to http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/2039/2, if anyone cares to add[edit]

Inconsistency in article[edit]

In the section "Health Effects: Cardiovascular Disease" the initial sentence is:

Evidence does not support a beneficial role for omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in preventing cardiovascular disease (including myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death) or stroke.

Yet the section "Mechanism of Action: The omega-6 to omega-3 ratio" contains the following:

... three studies published in 2005, 2007 and 2008, including a randomized controlled trial, found that, while omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are extremely beneficial in preventing heart disease in humans, the levels of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (and, therefore, the ratios) did not matter.

So, which part of the article is correct? Is there a lack of evidence or not? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.236.176.17 (talk) 08:08, 6 June 2014 (UTC)

Conflicting statments[edit]

The second paragraph in the section "The omega-6 to omega-3 ratio" contradicts the statement in the first that the ratio does not matter. Am I missing something? 2605:A601:5AF:7001:FDD3:B2ED:F1B7:187A (talk) 00:52, 17 September 2014 (UTC)