Talk:OpenGL ES

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Computing (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Computing, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of computers, computing, and information technology on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Google (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Google, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Google and related topics on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

BlackBerry OS 6.1 is going to support OpenGL-ES 2.0 pretty soon on phones currently running OS 6.0 —Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.189.54.253 (talk) 06:04, 13 January 2011 (UTC)


question[edit]

Are there any hardware solutions for OpenGL ES yet?

Yes, check out the MBX and SGX technology created by Imagination (http://www.powervr.com). Their technology is used in the Intel 2700G graphics accelerator (in Dell Axim x50/51v PDAs), in the new Freescale i.MX31 ARM-based CPU and some others. There are also many phones currently shipping using the MBX core such as the Nokia N93 and at least 6 OMAP based phones only available in the Japanese market.

NVIDIA and ATI also have mobile 3D chipsets supporting OpenGL ES 1.x. The ATI Imageon series and NVIDIA GoForce are the brand names. There are also somewhat smaller players such as Falanx (now part of ARM) which have the Mali 55 and Bitboys (now part of ATI). There are other hardware vendors out there, but I don't have their names handy.

iPod and iPhone[edit]

What's wrong with saying "phones, tablets, in-car devices" or similar? Marketing for iAnything shouldn't be on Wikipedia. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 94.189.177.84 (talk) 13:34, 22 January 2011 (UTC)

^^^ I've checked - the commit about iSomething was added by an unknown user... reverted the change

opengl 4.1 and opengl es 2.0[edit]

I've removed this recent edit: "OpenGL 4.1 is officially superset of OpenGL ES 2.0" which was not only in the wrong place, but is not entirely clear.

  1. The online documentation for opengl es 2.0 says "OpenGL ES 2.0 is defined relative to the OpenGL 2.0 specification" [1].
  2. The online documentation for opengl 4.1 says "Full compatibility with OpenGL ES 2.0 APIs for easier porting between mobile and desktop platforms" [2]
  3. The core specification PDF for opengl 4.1 [3] says "Improved OpenGL ES 2.0 compatibility by adding features previously found only in OpenGL ES 2.0 and not OpenGL 4.0 (GL_ARB_ES2_-compatibility)"

Therefore, I'm not sure whether saying that 3.1 is "officially a superset" of opengl es 2.0 is right. There's already a statement before that about the relation between opengl 2.0/opengl es 2.0, which I think is enough. pm (talk) 21:56, 25 January 2011 (UTC)

What's unclear? An API that was previously only in OpenGL ES 2.0 got added to OpenGL 4.1, making OpenGL 4.1 a strict superset of OpenGL ES 2.0 when OpenGL 4.0 is only an approximate superset. So the edit was correct. --David-Sarah Hopwood ⚥ (talk) 19:57, 2 October 2011 (UTC)

needs disambiguation[edit]

"Many other functions and rendering primitives were removed in version 1.0 to produce a lightweight interface, including:"


May need reinforcement that the following list is of FEATURES REMOVED

'they are :' replacing 'including' seems clearer to me

"the removed features include :" would be even better — Preceding unsigned comment added by 75.36.143.23 (talk) 02:57, 2 April 2013 (UTC)

Basing on OpenGL 2[edit]

The article says: "OpenGL ES 2.0 was publicly released in March 2007. It is based roughly on OpenGL 2.0, but it eliminates most of the fixed-function rendering pipeline in favor of a programmable one in a move similar to transition from OpenGL 3.0 to 3.1."

First, what does "based roughly" mean? Can it be described a bit more accurately? Second, the fully programmable graphics pipeline was included already in OpenGL 2.0. It is only deprecated in the 3.x spec. 80.223.182.224 (talk) 15:55, 15 June 2013 (UTC)

update[edit]

I wan't to update&support opel es3.0 Naruto2415 (talk) 17:04, 20 April 2014 (UTC)

opengl es3.0[edit]

We want to update Deknakon.2532 (talk) 04:20, 6 May 2014 (UTC)

glBegin & glEnd[edit]

In beginning of the article it is said that "One significant difference between OpenGL and OpenGL ES is that OpenGL ES removed the need to bracket OpenGL library calls with glBegin and glEnd. " but this doesn't make much sense since only the primitive declaration functions e.g. glVertex3f were affected by this restriction. These functions have been removed in OpenGL ES, as it is said later in the article. In the light of these facts, this whole sentence could be removed. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 46.163.250.82 (talk) 06:49, 25 June 2014 (UTC)

Strict subset of OpenGL?[edit]

OpenGL for Embedded Systems (OpenGL ES or GLES) is a subset of the OpenGL computer graphics rendering application programming interface (API) for rendering 2D and 3D computer graphics such as those used by video games

Is OpenGL ES really a strict subset of OpenGL? If so, is this true of all versions of OpenGL ES?

A quick web search turned up this StackOverflow answer indicating that it's not, but there's no reference to an authoritative source.

Wootery (talk) 12:56, 19 January 2015 (UTC)