Talk:Open Automated Demand Response

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Seriously needs simplification[edit]

For example, check this paragraph: Demand Response (DR) is a set of actions taken to reduce load when electric grid contingencies threaten supply-demand balance or market conditions occur that raise electricity costs. Automated demand response consists of fully automated signaling from a utility, ISO/RTO or other appropriate entity to provide automated connectivity to customer end-use control systems and strategies. OpenADR provides a foundation for interoperable information exchange to facilitate automated demand response.

This reads like someone is going out of their way to cram the maximum amount of jargon and polysyllabic words into each sentence.

Running this paragraph through the Gunning-Fog Index checker (http://gunning-fog-index.com/) returned a score of 21.47 - which is way to high to be usefully meaningful.

  • What does 'electric grid contingencies threaten supply-demand balance' mean?
  • What's an 'ISO/RTO'?
  • What does 'automated connectivity to customer end-use control systems and strategies' mean?
  • What does the last sentence mean?

--JRDSmith 09:23, 11 August 2014 (UTC)

The following sentence has a grammar problem:[edit]

An Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) outreach collaborative was eventually formed in October 2010 [2] and a related OpenADR Alliance "to accelerate the development, adoption and compliance of OpenADR standards throughout the energy industry" [3] and "provide common language" [4] for smart meters.

Article reads like an advertisement[edit]

Articles needs opinions from experts NOT involved with the project. It is very clear that most (all?) of the content is written directly by OpenADR participants. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.5.84.124 (talk) 06:02, 21 September 2012 (UTC)

Need major rework by an expert, and one that actually explains things[edit]

Holy crap, I guess this is what happens when you try to write an article on a technical topic using material from the PR department. An article with thousands of words that essentially says nothing about the topic and explains zero about the topic. North8000 (talk) 10:42, 23 August 2012 (UTC)

History section outdated[edit]

The 2.0 version was published in 2013, at least the A and B profiles - the more complicated C profile, AFAIK, is still in the works. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 91.217.255.5 (talk) 08:08, 19 September 2014 (UTC)