Talk:Oregon Geographic Names

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Oregon (Rated C-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Oregon, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of the U.S. state of Oregon on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
The current collaborations of the month are The Great Oregon Photo Drive of 2014.
WikiProject Maps (Rated C-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Maps, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Maps and Cartography on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
Checklist icon
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
Note icon
This article has been automatically rated by a bot or other tool because one or more other projects use this class. Please ensure the assessment is correct before removing the |auto= parameter.
This article had an importance automatically assigned to it. Once it has been checked by a human, please remove |autoi=yes.

Homesteading[edit]

The article says

the period of homesteading [was] between 1875 and 1925.

But the Homestead Act went into effect in 1862. That was preceded by the Donation Land Claim Act from 1850 to 1855. Does OGN specifically create the 1875–1925 era and call it "homesteading"? (I really gotta get my hands on that book...) —EncMstr 08:52, 11 February 2007 (UTC)

From the horse's mouth (please delete if this is a copyvio):

The origins of geographic names in Oregon may be traced roughly to six periods in the history of the state, and in most instances the names themselves indicate approximately the epoch in which they were applied. The six periods may be described as follows: ... Fifth: The homestead era. During the fifty years between 1875 and 1925, nine million acres qualified for final entry*, and thousands of family names were applied to creeks and buttes. There was also a multiple application of names generic to the land laws and the farming and grazing occupations, such as School Section Creek, Homestead, Freezeout Ridge, and Dipping Vat Creek.[1]

    So I think it literally means the period of homesteading between those years, but isn't saying that was the only time of homesteading. Instead the periods are designated by what affected the bulk of the place name applications. Before this particular era of homesteading, for example in the pioneer period, places were more often being named after their eastern counterparts and after pioneer** families, as well as important national political figures who had no connection to Oregon. **At some point there were enough people here that new arrivals ceased to be pioneers and became merely settlers. The text is a bit cryptic--the article could definitely use some clarification and examples. Katr67 21:03, 11 February 2007 (UTC)
    Now that I'm not sleepy, I'm thinking you're right on. Perhaps the Homestead Act didn't get a lot of notice from 1862 to 1875. Even in 2007, I have a hard time comprehending what might inspire a move from most anywhere to Nebraska or Iowa.... —EncMstr 00:54, 12 February 2007 (UTC)

    Refs for expansion[edit]

    Mary has also taken her father's place on the Oregon Geographic Names Board. Katr67 (talk) 18:16, 14 August 2009 (UTC)