Talk:Orion (constellation)

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Ancient reference to Orion in Job, book of the Bible[edit]

Perhaps the most ancient referral to Orion and Pleiades is in the Bible; [1] Janice208.64.220.209 (talk) 03:07, 21 January 2013 (UTC)

Bellatrix, left or right shoulder?[edit]

Regarding:

"Bellatrix serves as Orion's left shoulder."

Wouldn't it be more natural to use the perspective of the viewer and not Orion? That is, right shoulder instead of left shoulder? --Mortense (talk) 21:40, 19 February 2013 (UTC)

Equally the use of East-West throughout astronomy articles is confusing for the layman if the maps themselves never show that East-West is reversed as to how we expect Macgroover (talk) 07:43, 23 January 2014 (UTC)

Orion, Ophiuchus and Staal[edit]

I have never heard of a character named Ophiuchus in the Orion myth. Nor have any of the readily accessible sources; the only mythic significance I can find for Ophiuchus (and the only one listed for Ophiuchus here on Wikipedia) is a possible connection to Asclepius. But there it is in this article, attributed to The New Patterns in the Sky by Julius D. W. Staal. Does anyone have access to this book and can comment on its authoritativeness? -- Perey (talk) 13:18, 24 May 2013 (UTC)

Revert of edits about ancient Egypt[edit]

I rewrote the paragraphs about ancient Egypt in the "Ancient Near East" section for several reasons. An anonymous editor at the IP address 166.216.226.95 reverted my changes, so I want to explain my reasons for the rewrite.

The text that I found here says that the pharaoh Unas is said in the Pyramid Texts to "became great by eating the flesh of his mortal enemies and then slaying and devouring the gods themselves… After devouring the gods and absorbing their spirits and powers, Unas journeys through the day and night sky to become the star Sahu, or Orion." The first part is true (though rather unclear, as this article doesn't say that Unas' spirit eats the gods in the metaphor-laden Egyptian afterlife, not as a living king). It's also true that the texts say Unas becomes Orion. But even though Orion is said to give Unas "Great-Power rank" in the hymn that describes Unas as eating the gods, that doesn't mean Unas ate the gods and then became Orion. If the two events don't even follow each other, the description of Unas eating the gods is a complete digression from an article about Orion.

Second, much of the text about Egypt is sourced to Egyptian Myth and Legend by Donald Mackenzie, published in 1907. That is simply too old to be trusted for analysis of Egyptian religious beliefs, which didn't begin to be properly understood until a couple of shifts in scholarly thinking in the late 1940s and early 1970s. The other main source for the Egypt text is The Oxford Essential Guide to Egyptian Mythology (a collection of religion-related articles from the Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt), which is recent and reliable. The page range given in the citation is the article on Osiris, which does say that Osiris was identified with Orion. But it does not say some of the things that it is claimed to support, like the aforementioned problematic sentence: "After devouring the gods and absorbing their spirits and powers, Unas journeys through the day and night sky to become the star Sahu, or Orion."

Furthermore, some of the major aspects of Egyptian beliefs about Orion (the god Sah) were missing from this article. So I decided to rewrite the problem paragraphs using a different reliable source, George Hart's Dictionary of Egyptian Gods and Goddesses. The paragraphs I wrote describe how Orion was portrayed in Egyptian art; his relationship with Sopdet, which may be the biggest reason for his religious importance; and his connections with the dead pharaoh and with Osiris and Isis. And they do it with fewer words than the text that was there before. It's not perfect, but I think it's a major improvement. I would like the anonymous editor to explain why he or she thinks the original text was superior to what replaced it. A. Parrot (talk) 00:09, 18 July 2013 (UTC)

Duplicate ancient Egypt text[edit]

The detailed text about ancient Egyptian beliefs appears in the "Ancient Near East" section. There's a separate "Africa" section that consists of nothing but: "In ancient Egypt, the constellation of Orion was known to represent Osiris, who, after being killed by his evil brother Set, was revived by his wife Isis to live immortal among the stars." There are two problems with that text (it moves the focus to Osiris and his myth rather than Sah-who-was-linked-with-Osiris, and Osiris was usually said to live on in the Duat rather than the stars). But more importantly, Egyptian beliefs should appear in one section or the other. Egypt was part of Africa and of the ancient Near East, so it could legitimately be put in either section, but it should not be repeated like this. A. Parrot (talk) 00:09, 18 July 2013 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 23 May 2014[edit]

Please change "By extending the line of the Belt southwestward, Sirius (α CMa) can be found; northeastward, Aldebaran (α Tau). A line westward across the two shoulders indicates the direction of Procyon (α CMi)." to "By extending the line of the Belt southeastward, Sirius (α CMa) can be found; northweastward, Aldebaran (α Tau). A line eastward across the two shoulders indicates the direction of Procyon (α CMi).

Baja Tom (talk) 18:28, 23 May 2014 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done by PlanetStar (talk · contribs) at 04:28, 24 May 2014 (UTC). Mz7 (talk) 17:28, 24 May 2014 (UTC)
    • ^ Job 38:31. "Can you bind the chains of Peliades, or loose the cords of Orion?" in a conversation between the Lord God and Job.