Talk:Pablo Picasso/Archive 1

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Archive 1 | Archive 2

Relevant entry

List_of_Picasso_artworks_1961-1970 Amazing hubris. Could someone arrange for a more relevant entry? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 217.113.224.30 (talkcontribs) 10:28, May 2, 2005

Does anyone know if Picasso ever did any sculpting or metal work? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.49.145.74 (talkcontribs) 17:28, March 5, 2005
ye he did lol-

Quotes

  • "Computers are useless. They only give you answers." There are many websites that attribute this quote to Pablo Picasso. Do any of you fellow Wikipedians know of a reputable source (preferably with date) for this quote? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 130.238.41.202 (talkcontribs) 14:13, February 28, 2005
The quote about computers is cited by Julian Brown in the book "Minds, Machines, and the Multiverse" (ch. 2), so perhaps that gives it some authenticity! Dom 15:24, 10 January 2007 (UTC)
  • A Nazi officer is supposed to have come to his door brandishing a postcard and demanding, "Did you do this?" "No," Picasso is supposed to have replied, "you did." In Talk:Guernica (painting) it was removed as unreferenced.--Error 02:18, 15 Dec 2004 (UTC)
I've read that anecdote in several books on Picasso actually, though it seems more like an 'urban legend' anyway. (Cfitzart 08:37, 27 July 2005 (UTC))
  • I was wondering what the source to this claim is: "The act of painting was captured in a series of photographs by Picasso's most famous lover, Dora Maar, a distinguished artist in her own right." I would greatly appreciated it if anyone knows. Thanks —Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.117.168.31 (talkcontribs) 20:35, October 2, 2006
I'm not sure, one of his qoutes that i liked which i think are quite realible is; "their are painters that can change the sun into a yellow dot, but their are those who by their artistic skills and inteligence can change a yellow dot in to a sun". And yes Picasso whas very very cocky about himself, cause he was talking about himself here :) So i hope this will help..


Suckists

Who on earth were the Stuckists? [1] —Preceding unsigned comment added by Rrees (talkcontribs) 07:22, September 27, 2001

GWO - (who is only just resisting the urge to add "nobody ever called him an asshole" to the original page on Pablo Picasso...) —Preceding unsigned comment added by Texture (talkcontribs) 12:51, July 2, 2004
", a view echoed by the Stuckists" I'd like a reference for the 'must paint' line, by the way. Picasso was a horrid man and given to statements like that which he often as not didn't mean, so I'd like to know where/when he said it. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Conversion script (talkcontribs) 08:51, February 25, 2002

Well maybe he didn't mean it but he was scornful of Maar's photography and encouraged her to focus on her painting. Similarly for a number of his other mistresses, even Ferdinande was encouraged to paint. Whether there is one particular quote that will "prove" the point, I don't know, that would take a true scholar rather than a jobsworth like myself. Sorry you felt the need to remove the Stuckist reference I felt it made an interesting Wiki link. Unusual connections makes for interesting browsing. Also isn't "horrid man" a little strong? Wouldn't "flawed" be more neutral? —Preceding unsigned comment added by Rrees (talkcontribs) 07:22, September 27, 2001

He was always scornful of any woman's work as an artist. All of 'em. He didnt' think much of most painters, either. I think he was a great painter, but nasty. Read the Norman Mailer biography - he was more than flawed. I restrained myself from saying so in the entry, but someone will come along and document it in the 'life' section, I hope. On the Stuckists, I don't see why they shouldn't show up, but I wouldn't think in the introduction. --MichaelTinkler —Preceding unsigned comment added by Conversion script (talkcontribs) 08:51, February 25, 2002

I realise this is getting silly but I do think you are being unfair here. He felt Maar was a good artist but found it difficult to disentangle his feelings for her from his views on her works. He seemed to have a more balanced view of her in his last years. I don't really feel that Norman Mailer is the best biographer of Picasso either. I think you are over-stating the case for him being "nasty", he was capable of acts of great spite and cruelty, he could be cowardly and greedy but in a long and complex life that does not make him that different from many other people in similar situations. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Rrees (talkcontribs) 07:22, September 27, 2001

That's why I'm not writing the article, because I find it easier to be objective about his work (which I teach every spring) if I don't think about him as a person; everything I know about him as a person is repulsive. His shallow, unreflective politics, his treatment of his friends and lovers, and his ego. Many artists are that way, of course, and Norman Mailer's argument (tacit in the Picasso book, explicit about his own life) is that you have to be selfish FOR your art. I wonder. On the other hand, I reserve the right to edit the article - the Stuckists don't belong in the first paragraphs of anything except an article about late modern or postmodern art. I did rewrite the sentence to include his work-ethic. I really do think he was a great as well as an important artist, but I don't have to like him as a human being. --MichaelTinkler —Preceding unsigned comment added by Conversion script (talkcontribs) 08:51, February 25, 2002

Taking sides in the Spanish war

He was commisioned Guernica for the pavilion of the Spanish Republic in the Paris World Fair. Isn't that enough?--Error 02:18, 15 Dec 2004 (UTC)

Moreover, he was appointed director of Museo del Prado by the Republican Goverment during the the first years of the Spanish Civil War.

Missing the point

Aprt from a few references to Cubism, his blue period, and Guernica, this article only addresses his art as if it were evidence at a psychological inquest. Nothing wrong with showing him warts and all, but it doesn't sound as if the authors of this piece have any interest in his art or its place in Western culture (other than its dollar value). If Michale Trinkler teaches Picasso, then he should find something to say about him beyond this. 24.126.41.116 05:37, 1 Feb 2005 (UTC)

Periods

A timeline of his periods would add a great deal of understanding to his work. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Rossmay (talkcontribs) 09:01, March 19, 2005

It is not a hundered percent clear if the paintings in the 'early life' section were made by Picasso himself or his dad. -Dennis Schaaf —Preceding unsigned comment added by 12.234.175.108 (talkcontribs) 22:12, March 23, 2003

Removal of POV text

I removed the following: ...who was used to submissive women who lived for whatever scraps of affection or attention he deigned to give them -goethean 21:21, 20 May 2005 (UTC)

I think that the entire Personal life section has some POV issues. Parallel or Together? 04:00, 21 August 2005 (UTC)
Near the end of the "Later works" section: "Only later, after Picasso's death, when the rest of the art world had moved on from abstract expressionism, did the critical community come to see that Picasso had already discovered neo-expressionism and was, as usual, ahead of his time." - the last part especially ("as usual") is blatant POV. It may be true, but that's not enough if it's not NPOV. 86.136.255.25 03:03, 18 October 2006 (UTC)
I'm not sure, one of his qoutes that i liked which i think are quite realible is; "their are painters that can change the sun into a yellow dot, but their are those who by their artistic skills and inteligence can change a yellow dot in to a sun". And yes Picasso whas very very cocky about himself, cause he was talking about himself here :) So i hope this will help.. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 61.95.224.175 (talkcontribs) 00:10, October 19, 2006
if we are going to present these as quotes let's at least spell "there" correctly. Carptrash 04:04, 4 November 2006 (UTC)

Help

Where was picasso born and educarted? The preceding unsigned comment was added by 212.85.15.94 (talk • contribs) .

born is in the article - (October 25, 1881) in Málaga, Spain, it also says that he was educated at Academy of Arts (Academia de San Fernando) in Madrid (though for less than a year). Don't know why you added "Picasso was born in Barcelona" to the article. Cfitzart 13:22, 9 November 2005 (UTC)

I guess you don't like to do any research, but anyhow!! • Pablo Ruiz Picasso was born on October 25, 1881, Father Don José Ruiz Blasco (1838-1939), mother Doña Marie Picasso y Lopez (1855-1939). Born in Málaga, Spain. His father whas a painter, teaching at a local art and craft school. Picasso started his education with his father. but anyways, just google him. Aniek M —Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.87.33.150 (talkcontribs) 15:23, October 22, 2006

Vandalism

On 1 Nov 2005, a vandal using the anonymous IP 156.63.253.3 blanked several paragraphs in addition to the nonsense he/she added to the page. There were several rounds of vandalism from other anons in close proximity to this edit. Some but not all of these paragraphs were later added back to the article. I can understand if it was a deliberate editorial decision to leave these paragraphs out but I wanted to be sure it was not merely an oversight. Please see this edit for the apparently lost paragraphs. Thanks. Rossami (talk) 22:37, 29 November 2005 (UTC)

There are TWO figures on the right in his painting of Les Demoiselles d'Avignon which influenced his African period, not forty-seven! (theres only 5 figures in the whole picture so I dont know how 47 was arrived at) Please make sure this doesnt get changed again, as its the second time Ive had to change this back Cfitzart 10:20, 29 November 2005 (UTC)
It's simple vandalism. We catch what we can. Just keep it on your watch list. Wikibofh 14:37, 29 November 2005 (UTC)
This entry is currently so beset by pre-adolescent vandalism, maybe it should be temporarily closed to editing. JNW 03:07, 26 September 2006 (UTC)
I think this article should be protected from non-registered users. Virtually all of the vandalism is from anon. editors. On the other hand, that might push them to vandalize articles with less visibility. Cacophony 22:39, 6 November 2006 (UTC)

is there a way that we can get this article closed to non-registered users? I revert because of vandalism every day, often several times a day, and i see that many others are doing it [vandal patrol here] too, and so we are, combined, spending an hour or more of wikitime every day on this one article - and it is too much. Carptrash 15:29, 9 November 2006 (UTC)

Yes, in order to be semi-protected it needs to be listed on Wikipedia:Requests for page protection. I would do it myself, but I have other things going on. Thanks, Cacophony 18:03, 9 November 2006 (UTC)

Typo

pidgeons should be pigeons? Tried fixing it myself but the page is protected.

External Link to add

We are an international fine art gallery and publisher located in Scottsdale, AZ. We represent the original works of Pablo Picasso including ceramics and the lithographic works he created to promote his ceramics expositons, linocuts, and etchings. We are secondary market specialist in buying and selling and our focus is that of the original 20th century masters including Warhol, Picasso, Miro, Botero, Rockwell, Wyeth and more. Is it possible to be added to your External Links for Picasso as a source to acquire his works?

You can visit our website. This page is just to give an idea of Picasso's work and does not reflect our full inventory, we are in the process of reconstructing this site to show all of the Picasso works available. Thank You. American Fine Art Editions, Inc. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Artpub (talkcontribs) 10:40, May 19, 2006

Does anyone know how things are added to this site? I had inquired about adding an external link last week and have not heard a response, just want to make sure I am following the steps correctly. Please advise. Thank you. American Fine Art Editions, Inc. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.162.43.129 (talkcontribs) 23:09, May 26, 2006
It wouldn't be accepted as a link. Please see External Links#Links to normally avoid, specifically...
  • 3. Links that are added to promote a site.
  • 4. Sites that primarily exist to sell products or services.
Under Wikipedia policy, it'd be treated as spam and would be removed. Sorry, -- DeLarge 15:02, 12 June 2006 (UTC)

Trivia

According to this book [2] Picasso was born dead, the midwife pronounced him dead and left him on a table. His uncle then entered the room and revived him with a lung full of cigar smoke! Might be worth adding to early life section? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 170.252.64.1 (talkcontribs) 01:55, August 8, 2006

Cats or Pidgeons?

"Picasso's father was Jose Picasso, a painter whose specialty was the naturalistic depiction of cats". Cats? i'd read pidgeons, and i even remember seeing paintings of both father and son of pidgeons. so...which is it? (i won't change it until i've got some hard evidence). DonnyIDK 23:48, 20 September 2006 (UTC)

Mention of the Barcelona museum needs to be moved from 'early life', possibly to 'legacy'. JNW 23:00, 23 September 2006 (UTC)
I think you're right & I just tried patching it in there--good suggestion! Ewulp 23:44, 23 September 2006 (UTC)
Thank you. I think it does make more sense now. Best regards, JNW 03:23, 24 September 2006 (UTC)
By the way, he drawed pigeons, and he never really changed his name, cause he still has his father's name Ruiz, and he used Picasso cause it wasn't used as much as Ruiz, and everyone knows that he liked to feel speciale soooo... that is why he uses his mothers name... I like Wikipedia, but i mean what would you do with out Google... If anyone has anything to add, please do so. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.87.33.150 (talkcontribs) 15:49, October 22, 2006

Source

I was wondering what the source to this claim is: "The act of painting was captured in a series of photographs by Picasso's most famous lover, Dora Maar, a distinguished artist in her own right." I would greatly appreciated it if anyone knows thanks. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.117.168.31 (talkcontribs) 20:35, October 2, 2006

New Category

Why don't we add another category, Category:Communist millionaires? —Preceding unsigned comment added by Vladko (talkcontribs) 12:04, October 11, 2006

Good idea. Why don't you sign your postings? Carptrash 19:05, 11 October 2006 (UTC)

Picasso's race

I always thought he is italian, I'm wrong


Jewish Ancestry

Anyone knows if Picasso had any marrano roots?

Internal logic: editing suggestion

The words "Picasso had constructed a huge gothic structure" seem to have an unclear reference although the following text about Picasso being able to afford villas suggest an architectural meaning. If the meaning is the complex personal/sexual relations in his life, it could be made clearer.Pangapilot 00:54, 4 December 2006 (UTC)

Description

I think Picasso should be described as an 'Artist', rather than 'painter and sculptor', because his creative scope seemed very wide, and he practiced pottery, printmaking and designing, even did stage-designing for his friends (for Jean Cocteau, for example). --Objecthood 06:55, 10 January 2007 (UTC)

Bottom line

This article is poorly written and edited, filled with egregious grammatical errors, rather silly opinions by uninformed non-professionals, and flat-out factual mistakes. Until it is thoroughly edited, no serious discussion is possible.68.72.99.63 02:27, 14 January 2007 (UTC)

how did he influence the world

how did pablo picasso influence or change the world with his painting —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 82.68.225.110 (talk) 18:22, 15 January 2007 (UTC).

media?

I cant find what kind of paint he used. I've searched all over the place, maybe someone should add it, but I can't find it anywhere, or i'd add it myself --Zombieminion 4:20, 2 february 2007