Talk:Paolo Conte

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Untitled[edit]

It might be worth mentioning that Conte's work is now very familiar to American movie-going audiences, whether they know it or not. His song "Via Con Me" is used in a cleverly bizarre - or bizarrely clever - Coca Cola commercial widely shown in US movie theaters in early 2006. The surreal commercial features the adventures of Fritz, a 17th-century time traveler who visits the 21st century and brings Coke back to his own time, where it proves quite popular with the locals - including such non-17th century figures as Genghis Khan. The ad itself is odd enough, but when supplemented by Conte's cooler-than-cool song, which is almost entirely in Italian, it becomes a memorably weird minute.

From what I can find on the internet, it appears that the version heard in the commercial is from the soundtrack to the movie, "Welcome to Collinwood," scored by Mark Motherbaugh and somewhat speeded up from the way Conte actually sang it.

Both Conte's original version and the soundtrack version are on CD's that are available at amazon.com:

original: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000006R56/qid=1139100864/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/104-5842239-7374314?s=music&v=glance&n=5174

movie version: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00006JYC3/qid=1139100215/sr=1-6/ref=sr_1_6/104-5842239-7374314?s=music&v=glance&n=5174

Essexpa 02:48, 5 February 2006 (UTC)essexpa


I first heard "Happy Feet" on the Rush Limbaugh show - apparently Limbaugh is a huge fan of Conte's ChardingLLNL 12:49, 5 November 2006 (UTC)


is he the pianist too?[edit]

OK, the photograph shows him playing a grand piano, but the article defines him as a singer, but not as a pianist. I came to this page wondering whether it is him who plays in his recordings, therefore if so, could it be clearly stated? TIA,

Jerome Potts 00:24, 29 June 2006 (UTC)

Yes, he is the one playing the piano (he's always singing while playing the piano). I wonder where could it be clearly stated, however. It's pretty clear he has a microphone in front of him in the picture, and the picture is labeled "Paolo Conte in Berlin", how can this be confusing? --Cyclopia 13:17, 29 June 2006 (UTC)

Wonderful 2006 album[edit]

Can anyone find a source for that new album? His official website doesn't have anything. -- Stereo 13:57, 17 August 2006 (UTC)

The page intro looks like a Review.[edit]

"He both writes and performs his own material and his grainy, resonant voice redolent of Francophone singers like Jacques Brel adds a certain charm to his wistful, sometimes melancholic lyrics."


Anyone want to tell my WHY this has survived thus far? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 121.44.219.187 (talk) 10:56, 11 January 2008 (UTC)

Come Di (1986)[edit]

Added Come Di (1986) Curiously, that album is often missing in Conte's discographies even so it contains songs such as "Sparring partner" and "Come Di" (both released for the first time here, like all the rest of the album's tracks). —Preceding unsigned comment added by BouzoukiBjork (talkcontribs) 15:26, 22 April 2009 (UTC)