Talk:Parikshit

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Requested move[edit]

Reason: Parikshita (Parīkṣita, from the verb pari-īkṣ) and Parikshit (Parikṣit, variant Parīkṣit with fugal lengthening <NOT Parikṣita or Parīkṣita>, from the verb pari-kṣi) are quite different words, and only the latter is the name of the grandson of Arjuna (son of Abhimanyu and father of Janamejaya), whereas the former is not. It is a sad reflection upon the state of knowledge of Sanskrit that someone who actually did move Parikshita to its rightful place under Parikshit was accused of mischief, and the correct move undone. To someone who knows Sanskrit, this must seem barbarous. Anuragi 20:07, 11 October 2007 (UTC)

The first line of the article also requires editing, but since my computer cannot handle Indic scripts, I request someone to add a virāma sign under the end ta of the Nagari version of the name. Anuragi 20:15, 11 October 2007 (UTC)

  • Oppose unless it can be shown that this is not the relevant English usage. Strongly oppose IATA because English usage exists, but somebody ought to be smart enough to take the hint from AjaxSmack's comment to fix the missing redlink with a redirect. Gene Nygaard 16:19, 13 October 2007 (UTC)
  • In Sanskrit, parikşita- is a vowel-stemmed noun and forms its cases like (e.g.) Rāma-; but parikşit- is a consonant-stemmed noun and forms its cases otherwise: it is like the difference between Latin/Ancient Greek second and third declensions. However, in modern usage, the final short "a" is often omitted, following modern Indian language spoken usage, e.g. "Ram" for "Rama". (I have put the virāma in.) Anthony Appleyard 18:26, 13 October 2007 (UTC)
  • Since "Parikshit" does indeed reproduce the correct Sanskrit form, whereas "Parikshita" is simply an ignorant mistake (even the link at the bottom to "Story of the great Parikshita" actually leads to a page on Parikshit [sic]!), my suggestion is to move the whole article to "Parikshit", and to put a link under "Parikshita" for those who wrongly think that, because the end a is often dropped in New Indo-Aryan words, this must have happened here too. 84.144.69.80 21:37, 13 October 2007 (UTC)
  • Who or what, then, is genuinely called Parīkṣita? Anthony Appleyard (talk) 17:00, 13 March 2008 (UTC)

Answer: Parīkṣita is a past participle meaning "scrutinised", "examined" and the like, and is not the name of any major (or, to my knowledge, even minor) mythological character. Why this word crops up is seemingly because of a wrong back-formation by speakers of some New Indo-Aryan languages (including Hindi), in which the 'a' of Sanskrit words is routinely dropped at the end of a word. Parīkṣita as a loan-word is common (in the meaning above) in New Indo-Aryan languages, and has obviously been confused with the mythological name, because the pronunciation is similar. Also, shoddiness in the differentiation between i and ī is also very common in New Indo-Aryan. Anuragi (talk) 12:04, 17 April 2008 (UTC)


at anuragi:but does not every sanskrit word/name end w/ a vowel? and Indo-Aryan? u mean Indo-European, no? (unknown contributor)

No, many Sanskrit words do not end on a vowel. And no, I mean New Indo-Aryan, as written. We are talking of Sanskrit loanwords in later Indic languages; Indo-European is quite pre-Sanskrit and not Indic. Anuragi (talk) 22:51, 14 August 2012 (UTC)

The article says nothing about Parikshit being a mythological figure even though it is classified as mythology. Conversely, if he was a historical figure, why is the article included in Hinduism project ? ~~ — Preceding unsigned comment added by Danishctc (talkcontribs) 07:22, 24 June 2014 (UTC)

He was a historical king, but many legends later arose about him. His genealogy and the stories of his life and death in the Mahabharata are considered mythology. All characters in the Mahabharata have this classification here. Avantiputra7 (talk) 17:02, 30 July 2014 (UTC)