Talk:Parton (particle physics)

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Pair distribution function[edit]

Are you guys really sure that "Pair distribution function" should redirect here? I think it is a separate concept, and I'm not even sure how it relates to this topic. --spiralhighway 02:33, 21 June 2006 (UTC)

Generalized parton distributions[edit]

I added a brief paragraph on generalized parton distributions under the Parton distribution functions section, to satisfy a Requested Article request. Generalized parton distributions now redirects here. Since there is so little on ordinary parton distribution functions, I felt that generalized pdf's didn't warrant their own page. HEL 02:11, 9 October 2006 (UTC)

Merger Proposal[edit]

The information on Parton distributions is spread between two pages. Maybe it should be merged? 138.253.48.39 (talk) 10:59, 21 April 2009 (UTC)

Good idea. Marge them. Pulu (talk) 07:04, 5 April 2010 (UTC)

Picture Quality[edit]

Can we possibly get a better quality picture for the Parton Scattering than Parton_Scattering.PNG? It is obviously made in Paint, is badly done, and has a low resolution. Although it does get the point across and should be chosen over a higher quality (but less understandable) picture, Wikipedia should have pictures that are both easily understandable AND high quality. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Firestar27 (talkcontribs) 02:28, 19 April 2010 (UTC)

TERRIBLE paragraph[edit]

Any bored physics graduates fancy rewording the following paragraph (which contains no links, and reads dreadfully imho)?

"An interesting fact about partons is that they are defined with respect to a physical scale (as probed by the inverse of the momentum transfer). For instance, a quark parton at one length scale can turn out to be a superposition of a quark parton state with a quark parton and a gluon parton state together with other states with more partons at a smaller length scale. Similarly, a gluon parton at one scale can resolve into a superposition of a gluon parton state, a gluon parton and quark-antiquark partons state and other multiparton states. Because of this, the number of partons in a hadron actually goes up with momentum transfer. At low energies (i.e. large length scales), a baryon contains three valence partons (quarks) and a meson contains two valence partons (a quark and an antiquark parton). At higher energies, however, observations show sea partons (nonvalence partons) in addition to valence partons."

188.220.171.33 (talk) 16:01, 14 May 2011 (UTC)

Named after Dolly?[edit]

Bill Bryson relays the story that Richard Feynman suggested naming what became quarks "partons" after Dolly Parton. I don't see any reference to this in the article. Can anyone verify it?Trashbird1240 (talk) 19:49, 30 June 2011 (UTC)

List of PDF groups is incomplete![edit]

The list of active PDF groups is incomplete: HERAPDF and ABKM PDF groups are not mentioned. HERAPDF is a PDF set based on a consistent data from HERA ep collider, which is free of corrections existent in the fixed target data (which are arguable and not yet understood and present in the global PDF fit analyses. therefore HERAPDF provides an important cross check on the current understanding of PDFs). This set is supported and cross checked by both H1 and ZEUS collaborations. ABKM is another PDF set based on a different theoretical framework (heavy flavour treatment) than the groups mentioned in this article. Both sets provide PDFs also at NNLO, much needed for reliable predictions at the LHC, therefore they are actually used by the experiments at the LHC. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 92.224.17.219 (talk) 10:32, 3 July 2011 (UTC)