Talk:Peanut butter

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George Washington Carver[edit]

The page on George Washington Carver emphasizes that he did not invent peanut butter -- should the link to his article be here? --- Etaoin 21:43 31 Dec 2003 (UTC)

If it's generally believed that he did, then I'd say it's relevant. Even if to simply disprove that. -- Darac Marjal 14:25, 14 Apr 2004 (UTC)

While he did not invent peanut butter, the statement that he only began research on peanuts in 1915 is FALSE. It needs to be changed. He started research in 1880 (YES, before any of those white men listed above him) and was the first of American (post Maya and Aztec) inventors to popularize peanut butter in the American South. How about you say that instead?

Assuming that you have the source, you should be the one say that and include the source.

Expires on December 26?[edit]

something wrong here... — Preceding unsigned comment added by ‎124.168.19.203 (talk) 11:33, 28 October 2006‎

Possible edit to Trivia section[edit]

The reference to the FDA allowing up to 2 rodent hairs per 100g of peanut butter is contradicted by the FDA's own website: http://www.fda.gov/ora/compliance_ref/cpg/cpgfod/cpg570-300.html. The citation link that is there is broken and the website it leads to is not cited and is amateurish.— Preceding unsigned comment added by ‎12.240.19.202 (talk) 06:56, 29 January 2007

Please stop mentioning Carver.[edit]

The recent edit I made was simple. It was retracting a sentence and a reference that says Carver was the original inventor. The profile page made in 2011 was clearly sensationalist and didn't even have any source; it also stole content from #history and then twisted it in the next sentence. The article is not reliable, therefore once again, can not be cited here. Here's a quote from the article:

"Agricultural chemist, George Washington Carver discovered three hundred uses for peanuts and hundreds more uses for soybeans, pecans and sweet potatoes. He start popularizing uses for peanut products including peanut butter, paper, ink, and oils beginning in 1880. The most famous of Carver's research took place after he arrived in Tuskeegee in 1896. However, Carver did not patent peanut butter as he believed food products were all gifts from God. The 1880 date precedes all the above inventors except of course for the Incas, who were first. It was Carver who made peanuts a significant crop in the American South in the early 1900's."

Sure he did... Also, Tuskeegee is not a town, Tuskegee is. "Carver began his peanut research in 1903", almost 20 years after peanut butter was patented.

The law and the term "peanut butter"[edit]

If I recall, it must be 90% peanuts or else they have to call it a "spread", not a "butter".

"Peanut butter must contain at least 90% peanuts (finished product weight), according the the Food & Drug Administration’s Code of Federal Regulations."

Older book references[edit]

Moving from the article to here, as these are out of date and offer limited value to the general user. --Zefr (talk) 00:09, 17 May 2015 (UTC)

  • Erlbach, Arlene (1993). Peanut Butter. Lerner Publications. 
  • Patrick, Jr., Coyle, L. (1982). The World Encyclopedia of Food. Facts on File. 
  • Lapedes, Daniel (1977). McGraw Hill Encyclopedia of Food, 4th ed. Agriculture and Nutrition. McGraw-Hill. 
  • Woodroof, Jasper Guy (1983). Peanuts: Production, Processing, Products. Avi Publishing Company. 
  • Zisman, Honey (1985). The Great American Peanut Butter Book: A Book of Recipes, Facts, Figures, and Fun. St. Martin's Press.