Talk:Pennsylvania Dutch Country

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emigration from Lancaster co[edit]

I removed the recent addition: A large number of emigrants have left the Lancaster County area in modern times, moving northward into the Endless Mountains of Pennsylvania, and the Finger Lakes, the Mohawk Valley, and even farther north in New York, spreading the culture over a wider area.not because it is untrue but because it was inserted smack in the middle of an unrelated paragraph, separating "topic sentence" from additional amplification. While probably true (except for the "large number") I am not sure what to do with it. It can accurately be said that nearly every county on the East coast has been a large source of emigrants for westward expansion. It is a basic fact of american demographic history. These two destinations were not especially prominent ones. According to a history of the Amish and Mennonites, most of the emigration in the 19th century of the Amish was further west into Western Pa, Ohio, Indiana and Canada. There are few Amish in the Endless mountains region as it is not prime farm country. If Pollinator is not referring to Amish emigration, I suspect those specific destinations are fairly minor ones compared with the major directions of internal westward migration in the 19th century. Accurate references to "large numbers" rather than a few families might be convincing info otherwise. alteripse 10:36, 9 September 2005 (UTC)

Adding Amish Farm & House and Amish Village[edit]

Not only do these sites add to experiencing the Amish, it is my understanding from trips to Amish country that the Amish prefer to have non-Amish visit these places as opposed to wandering and gawking around the farmland. If you wave at Amish in the fields they don't wave back - their rationale allegedly is that if they spent all day waving, they'd never get any work done. Simesa 19:05, 10 April 2007 (UTC)

I wrote to these two places and The Amish Experience asking all three of them to put up proper articles, with emphasis on what is encyclopedicially notable as opposed to being just advertisements. Simesa 20:07, 10 April 2007 (UTC)

Wrong counties[edit]

The six Penna Dutch Counties are

Northampton Lehigh Berks Lancaster York Lebanon

Clearly culture does not stop at the county line, but these are the six which were predominately Dutch. It is a stretch to include any others.

In particular, the map needs to be updated to color Northampton County red. Easton, and especially Bethlehem were traditionally Dutch cities. Bethlehem had no English speakers at all well into the 19th century. Northampton is still a relatively Dutchified Borough.

Tom, tharwick@wans.net

Agreed Tom Bethlehem is definatley a sister town to Lititz in Lancaster with its strong Moravian history. There are also many more in Maryland where Lancaster, York, and Adams border the Counties of Cecil, Hartford, and Fredrick. I would also suggest putting some of that also in the red zone. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 166.66.16.116 (talk) 08:46, 20 January 2009 (UTC)

I agree. To call Centre County (f'rinstance) part of the Dutch Country is a stretch. You might see buggies there, but I wouldn't call it Dutch Country. PurpleChez (talk) 03:28, 29 April 2013 (UTC)

The term "Dutch" is an archaic term for Germans,[edit]

Call me a nit picker, but I always hate to see statements like this in the Wiki articles about the Dutch. Dutch is not archaic at all. 300 years ago, and today, Germans of all types referred to themselves as Deutsch. Dutch was then, and is now, a corruption of that.

Tom ,tharwick@wans.net


Dutch = Netherlands Deutsch = Germany, Not that hard to remember 84.105.202.233 06:45, 12 November 2007 (UTC)

I agree, the entry needs to point out that the use of "Dutch" to refer to Amish in Pennsylvania is an historical corruption of "Deutsch".

"Dutch" is not a corruption of Deutsch in this context, but rather a translation of the Pennsylvania Dutch ethnonym "Deitsch". The mother tongue of the Pennsylvania Dutch was not Standard German, and so they wouldn't have called themselves "Deutsch". Furthermore, historically "Dutch" in English did refer to Germans. saɪm duʃan Talk|Contribs 06:05, 26 April 2011 (UTC)

Amish Country[edit]

I would like to suggest that "Amish Country" be made into a full article about the Amish and their wide area of settlement across the US rather than having it redirect to this specific region of Pennsylvania. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.76.224.163 (talk) 00:06, 16 April 2009 (UTC)