Talk:Periander

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Hi, we are a group of Colgate Students, who will be editing this page for our Legacies of the Ancient World class.

Two Perianders?[edit]

'Sotion, and Heraclides, and Pamphila, in the fifth book of her Commentaries, says that there were two Perianders; the one a tyrant, and the other a wise man, and a native of Ambracia. And Neanthes of Cyzicus makes the same assertion, adding, that the two men were cousins to one another. And Aristotle says, that it was the Corinthian Periander who was the wise one; but Plato contradicts him.' (Diogenes Lærtius, The Lives of Eminent Philosophers) --- Nalco 01:24, 1 May 2007 (UTC)