Talk:Peridotite

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Copyright problem removed[edit]

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Peridot[edit]

What if any, is the relationship between peridot and peridotite? Are the names a coincidence?

I do not know for sure but would think that it has something to do with the high amount of olivine in both aforementioned substances.

Peridot, the gemstone is in fact, magnesium rich forsterite olivine. Fayalite, the iron olivine, is usually less green and transparent.Rolinator 12:14, 28 December 2005 (UTC)

Yes. Peridot is a gem variety of olivine, while peridotite is a rock composed chiefly of olivine. Peridot, being an olivine, is a mineral. Peridotite, being a rock, is a composition of minerals but composed chiefly of peridot or another olivine mineral. --Valich 03:39, 31 October 2006 (UTC)

Geology Project[edit]

I have added the Geology template as this article has a lot of geology information that hard to ignore. Solarapex 03:32, 11 May 2007 (UTC)

Potential for Carbon Storage[edit]

It has been recently discovered that Peridotite can turn CO2 in the air into harmless compounds like calcite at an astonishing rate. since this rock could potentially become a major topic of interest to environmental efforts, it might be a good idea to mention that. source: http://cleantechnica.com/2008/11/10/scientists-discover-rock-that-can-absorb-carbon-dioxide-emissions-directly-from-the-air/ —Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.132.41.57 (talk) 01:50, 11 November 2008 (UTC)