Talk:Phragmites

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Invasive/exotic[edit]

changed invasive to exotic, because while phragmites is native, it is also invasive. It causes a monoculture and drives out other species due to nutrient loading.

Link to the paper: "Cryptic invasion by a non-native genotype of the common reed, Phragmites australis, into North America" was broken on 10/12/06, I contacted Cornell about the link and left it linked for now. Dave 18:00, 12 October 2006 (UTC)

The link[edit]

I fixed the link, Matti

Reeds[edit]

"Moses was "drawn out of the water where his mother had placed him in a reed basket to save him from the death that had been decreed by the Pharaoh against the firstborn of all"

Are we sure this is the right plant, this grass does not seem like it would back a good basket - now a basket made out rushes would float nicely. Also the picture is huge. Hardyplants 15:10, 25 August 2007 (UTC)

It could be, but somehow I doubt it. As I remember it the plant in the story (and in songs?) is also called "rushes" – and then there is papyrus, a reed-like plant widespread along the Nile, which is actually used to make boats. Somehow I don't think botany was a priority for these writers... I've mentioned papyrus as a possibility in the article. --Richard New Forest (talk) 13:46, 12 March 2008 (UTC)

Musical Reed[edit]

Is this the same reed used for making musical instruments (clarinet, oboe) as well? Kortoso (talk) 21:46, 14 December 2011 (UTC)

The commercial reeds for these instruments are made from Arundo donax, but Phragmites was no doubt used for reeds in the past.--Curtis Clark (talk) 02:10, 15 December 2011 (UTC)

Length[edit]

This article has a "too long" tag. Is this a genuine comment, or vandalism? The article seems really quite short, if anything. --Richard New Forest (talk) 13:46, 12 March 2008 (UTC)

Psychedelic reeds[edit]

There is a link to Psychedelic plants, but no explanation of this in either Phragmites or Psychedelic plants. Is this another red herring? --Richard New Forest (talk) 13:46, 12 March 2008 (UTC)

It's not a red herring, the roots contain DMT. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 209.104.242.106 (talk) 21:01, 29 April 2008 (UTC)

DMT is presumably Dimethyltryptamine. That article mentions the rather similar reed canary-grass (Phalaris arundinacea) as containing DMT, and so does the reed canary-grass article. Does Phragmites definitely have it too? Do you have a reference for it? The link you gave below just says the rhizomes are edible, but does not mention DMT. --Richard New Forest (talk) 21:36, 29 April 2008 (UTC)

Edible?[edit]

Q: acording to the u.s army it is an edibal food-it is listed in there field survival handbook thing (Unsigned comment added by User:81.153.19.185 19:34, 28 March 2008)

A: The rhizomes are edible, despite the presence of the psychoactive compound DMT. DMT is not orally active due to the human body's production of monoamine oxidase, which destroys the DMT.

The rhizomes are apparently high in sugar, which could provide a useful source of calories in a survival situation. Further, they require no preparation aside from being dug up and washed, which would be simple given the environment required for phragmites growth.

http://www.pfaf.org/leaflets/edibpond.php

(Unsigned comment added by User:209.104.242.106 22:01, 29 April 2008)

Phragmites communia[edit]

Common reed used to be called Phragmites communia. Is that the same as what is now called Phragmites communis? Kingturtle (talk) 16:59, 5 June 2008 (UTC)

Pronunciation[edit]

A note on the pronunciation of the word would be helpful. 72.229.42.246 (talk) 02:15, 6 August 2011 (UTC)

The description does not explain if all types of reed are hollow. Logitudinal and cross section of the stem should be described and shown. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2.85.8.147 (talk) 01:20, 22 September 2013 (UTC)