Talk:Pietas

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Untitled[edit]

there are is more to Pietas, like it has two coins, a girl and boy, for the romans believed there were different virtues for men and women

material from mos maiorum[edit]

The following material from mos maiorum could be copyedited and incorporated here: Cynwolfe (talk) 01:57, 9 September 2010 (UTC)

Pietas could be displayed in numerous ways. For example, Julius Caesar displayed pietas during his life by beginning in 52 BCE and dedicating in 48 BCE, after the battle of Pharsalus, a temple to Venus Genetrix. The temple was dedicated to Venus as the mother of Aeneas and thus the ancestor of the Julii (the gens of Julius Caesar). Augustus, after the death of Marcus Antonius and with Marcus Aemilius Lepidus out of the way[1] (these two men are Augustus’ co-triumvirs in the Second Triumvirate), built a Temple of Caesar in order to honor his adoptive father.

The emperor Antoninus Pius received this addition [i.e., pius] to his name because of his role in convincing the senate to deify his adoptive father, the emperor Hadrian, and for the pietas he showed toward his elderly biological father in public.

Similar to other abstract concepts in Roman culture, Pietas appeared often in anthropomorphic form, and was sometimes accompanied by a stork (a symbol of filial piety) [NOTE: “Pietas,” O.C.D. p. 1182] She was adopted by Augustus as Pietas Augusta to display his own pietas, as can be seen on coins from the period [NOTE: Adkins. p.180]

  1. ^ Stambaugh. pg 50