Talk:Pigeon post

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Potential Copyright infringement[edit]

"The pigeons carried two kinds of despatch: official and private, both of which are later described in detail." In the section on Paris looks as if it may be lifted from a different source without proper attribution. Later in this section we do not really find official and private separately described in detail. While the section has attribution to a source (a book) it reads as if it was possibly lifted from a book and merely transcribed into wikipedia. If this in fact comes from the book, then the way it is currently used would be in violation of copyright law. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 65.0.91.3 (talk) 00:03, 17 May 2010 (UTC)

Unclear opening paragraph[edit]

I don't really know anything about the subject so I'm not going to do a write-up, but if anyone sees this the opening paragraph seems to have had a chunk of it cut out, or something... Deptstoremook 20:43, 9 October 2007 (UTC)

The opening paragraph was left into its place by SlipperyHippo in an otherwise sensible edit. I wrote a short new opening paragraph and moved the sentece to its original place. --MPorciusCato 06:47, 10 October 2007 (UTC)

Again, the opening paragraph was changed, this time by Sting au in a series of otherwise very good edits. However, I think that his version is not very good: Pigeon post is the use of homing pigeons to carry messages and is as old as the ancient Persians from whom the art of training the birds probably came. The Greeks conveyed the names of the victors at the Olympic Games to their various cities by this means.

This opening paragraph is not clear. First, the sentence "Pigeon post is the use--" is not very good English. At least, it should have the form: "Pigeon post means the use --" Second, continuing this sentence with "--and is as old as the ancient Persians--", is even worse English. In my view, the original paragraph The use of homing pigeons to carry messages is as old as the ancient Persians from whom the art of training the birds probably came. The Greeks conveyed the names of the victors at the Olympic Games to their various cities by this means." is very good start for the History section. However, the opening paragraph must contain the sentence mentioning that this method is obsolete and historical. --MPorciusCato (talk) 14:35, 21 February 2008 (UTC)

Pigeon post is the use....was good English. I'm changing it back. Sting au Buzz Me... 11:26, 22 February 2008 (UTC)

.:As you like. I have nothing at stake here. However, I took the liberty of breaking the opening sentene into two parts, making it more readable. In addition, I removed the book URL. That URL does not contain the book, so it is unappropriate. --MPorciusCato (talk) 14:12, 22 February 2008 (UTC):.

Outdated?[edit]

The great mario of Wikipedia is up-to-date information. However, in this article: In view of the development of wireless telegraphy the modern tendency is to consider fortress warfare as the only sphere in which homing pigeons can be expected to render really valuable services. Consequently, British Admiralty has discontinued its pigeon service, which had attained a remarkably high standard of efficiency, and other powers will no doubt follow the example. Nevertheless, large numbers of birds are, and will presumably continue to be, kept at the great inland fortresses of France, Germany and Russia. A bit outdated, perhaps? Encyclopedia Britannica of 1911 is a great source, but should be used with moderation. --MPorciusCato 22:04, 19 November 2006 (UTC)

Having found time, I made some careful changes to show that the text is no longer valid. --MPorciusCato 14:03, 9 January 2007 (