Talk:Pike's Peak Gold Rush

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Untitled[edit]

Start of Talk:

1890's Sugar-Beet industry(local)[edit]

The following discussion can be found in the quarterly reports, of the Colorado Historical Society, (up to the year 1980 or so)(I do not Know the Volume No., nor the Year).

Following the sequence of Placer mining, then Hard rock mining, financiers from the Eastern United States, (Buffalo, etc), planned the next resource available for mining in Colorado (for tapping the Mining/Natural resources of Colorado).

The Sugar beet industry of South eastern Colorado, required land, Water, and financing. The factory that was built: Circa 1905, for producing Sugar, was only decomissioned, I think in the early 1960's.

The story of the minerals, went from Placer, to Hard-Rock, then to this 3 rd alternative, which again was used for some 60+ years. (Water, was the resource, and the Land, and the HuManpower.) Michael,inHOTdesertYuma,AZ, ....--Mmcannis 00:19, 2 July 2006 (UTC)


Towrds the end of the article there is a sentence that states: "The site of the discovery is in the present-day Denver suburb of Englewood, just northwest of the junction of U.S. Highway 285 and Interstate 70."

This is impossible. I was born in and live in Denver, these two highways do not meet. Perhaps I-25?

Change Name to Pike's Peak Gold Rush[edit]

I recommend that this article Colorado Gold Rush be renamed and moved to Pike's Peak Gold Rush, the contemporary name of the gold rush. The name "Colorado Gold Rush" was not applied until the Colorado Territory was created in 1861, after the initial rush had largely subsided.

--Buaidh 20:10, 5 December 2006 (UTC)

I moved Colorado Gold Rush to Pike's Peak Gold Rush

--Buaidh 23:08, 19 December 2006 (UTC)

Pike's Peak was simplified by the USGS to eliminate the apostrophe. See Pikes Peak, Name. Are we keeping the apostrophe for the historical name of the rush? I suggest changing the name of the page to Pikes Peak Gold Rush Srwalden (talk) 21:53, 29 July 2010 (UTC)

Caption to lead photo[edit]

I changed the caption of the lead photo from "Miners at Pike's Peak" to "Prospector in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado" for the following reasons: 1) the location is not identified in the cited source, 2) The landscape looks very unlike that around Pike's Peak, 3) No significant mining was done near Pike's Peak during the Pike's Peak Gold Rush, and 4) The man and donkey appear to be engaged in prospecting rather than mining. If I am mistaken, please correct me.Plazak 16:21, 28 October 2007 (UTC)