Talk:Pit toilet

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Question[edit]

What is the difference between a pit toilet and a cesspool? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 216.15.33.151 (talk) 15:23, 29 July 2009 (UTC)

Comment[edit]

I removed The Andy Gump company calls these tank trucks and their associated sump pumping equipment by the alliterative name, the Gump Dump Sump Pump. Regardless of the name, there are numerous Licensed waste hauling companies providing such service in areas where it is needed. I assumed this was a reference to Forest Gump. In any case, it doesn't belong here. If someone cares enough about it, it should be moved to a section. "Pit Toilets in Fiction", anyone? --Mdwyer 01:04, 21 December 2005 (UTC)

Bucket system link[edit]

the bucket system link is fine, but the bit about it being eliminated in South Africa seems a tad odd. I'll just prune this link down to just bucket system

Merger proposal[edit]

An Outhouse, as the article explains, is more than a pit toilet

This article and outhouse appear to be essentially the same thing. Why do these two separate articles exist? It doesn't really matter which title is primarily used for the topic, but they should be merged into one article. DMahalko (talk) 10:36, 2 November 2009 (UTC)

The English expression Outhouse, as the article also quite well explains, is more than just a pit toilet. It was a detached house, that was used for multiple purposes, usually stable, toilet and storage. Therefore this character should be explained in an own article. The parts that pertain to a pit toilet only should of course be explained in detail in that article.--Wuselig (talk) 14:01, 30 June 2010 (UTC)
Oppose Outhouse and pit toilet are completly different things! An outhouse is a building for a start. 87.194.208.119 (talk) 20:30, 8 July 2010 (UTC)

Pejorative image removal? (Pit toilet being manually emptied)[edit]

A night soil man, known in his country as a frogman, manually removing the waste from a permanent concrete-lined pit toilet in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

This image and caption were removed with the reason "pejorative picture". It illustrates a common structure and job in Tanzania. The term "frogman" is in fact the polite form used primarily in literature on the topic, according to this. I disagree that it's pejorative, and am restoring the image, with caption, and adding that citation. Please weigh with an opinion if you think it should be kept or removed, with reason if favoring removal.

WP:INAPPROPRIATE, for background, includes among inappropriate content "Text that is intended to attack or disparage the subject. For example, if something derogatory is found in an article about a person using a pejorative term against that person's ethnicity, it shall be promptly removed."

--Agyle (talk) 14:36, 7 January 2014 (UTC)

there is nothing 'pejorative'. such occupations were very common in the past. I will try to find some info about historical russian occupation called 'zolotar' , literally 'goldman' (a hint on something yellow in the pit :-). nothing surprizing somewhere it still exists. - Altenmann >t 16:35, 7 January 2014 (UTC)

stalin's footprints[edit]

It is a pity that this incorrect information is spread over internet with the help of wikipedia mirrors and spin-offs. Somebody obviously used machine translation from Estonian and added own speculation. In fact, this humorous slang term is a parody of the Soviet cliche "Following Stalin's (foot)steps" . After Soviet Army left Baltic states, their barracks attracted attention of wide public. these barracks had industrially manufactured removable steel pit covers, which had a funnel-shape hole and two platforms (not "pits") for feet with corrugated anti-slip surface. It would be interesting to find a photo or serious description. They were used elsewhere, e.g. at small railway stations with little infrastructure. I doubt the term had any usage outside Estonian. - Altenmann >t 16:52, 7 January 2014 (UTC)