Talk:Plasma oscillation

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Bohm-Gross dispersion relation[edit]

The Bohm-Gross dispersion relation refers to electron plasma waves, which are not the same as plasma oscillations. Plasma oscillations are free uncoupled oscillations, there is nothing such as a wave number or wave propagation. Electron waves do propagate.

I have the terminology from Chen p. 130. What you say is logical, even if the usage is not universal. If it bothers you, you might want to clarify the different uses of the terms in this article, add some redirect pages, and maybe rename this page. --Art Carlson 12:03, 20 December 2005 (UTC)

Page Request[edit]

I would like to request that this page be updated with a discussion of the dependence of the transparency of materials on the plasma frequency. Perhaps a separate page for "Plasma Frequency" should be made. Also, some clarification on warm and cold electrons would be nice. Sabers 16:17, 15 March 2006 (UTC)

Units[edit]

I think your units are wrong, at least on the 'cold' electron part. I get m^2/s rather than the ugly units your give-which honestly do not make much sense physically. 129.93.61.100 (talk) 22:35, 16 February 2008 (UTC) Jared Hansen

I also think the units are wrong, but I get s-1 which makes perfectly sense for a frequency. Paul (talk) 16:34, 31 October 2008 (UTC)

Changed in the page. Paul (talk) 17:28, 20 November 2008 (UTC)

Plasma waves vs waves in plasmas[edit]

Can someone please explain what is the difference between plasma waves and waves in plasmas. The name plasma waves is confusing if it is used for a particular kind of wave. If there is a more specific word for it, please use it. Also I think it need more explanation, what the word plasma waves is referring to. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Caco de vidro (talkcontribs) 18:36, 21 February 2008 (UTC)

I'm not sure how common it is to just say "plasma wave". It seems that the term, if it is used at all, is usually qualified, such as "electron plasma wave" or "electrostatic plasma wave". Maybe it is better to leave out the term altogether, at least in the lead. That should eliminate any confusion. --Art Carlson (talk) 20:41, 21 February 2008 (UTC)

Ion plasma frequency[edit]

This article is linked from Lower hybrid oscillation, which mentions the ion plasma frequency, so I think it would make sense to define the ion plasma frequency here. — Preceding unsigned comment added by BogJohnson (talkcontribs) 14:57, 18 October 2011 (UTC)

A number of article mention the ion plasma frequency, including Plasma parameters, Plasma-immersion ion implantation, Waves in plasmas, and Magnetic reconnection. Some of them link it as "ion plasma frequency", which, as you point out, redirects here, where the ion plasma frequency is not even mentioned. We could link everything to Plasma_parameters#Frequencies, where the ion plasma frequency is at least defined, but it is a shame that no article talks about the physics that makes that frequency important. A minimal solution might be to add a section to Plasma oscillation that defines the ion plasma frequency and mentions the topics (articles) where it plays a role. It can later be expanded with some more background on the physics. I would be interested in doing that part myself, but I would need to spend some time thinking about it first. --Art Carlson (talk) 07:15, 19 October 2011 (UTC)

cold? warm?[edit]

How does the author not realize that the terms "cold" and "warm" when referring to electrons need to be defined. You need an incredible lack of common sense to do this. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 128.62.32.19 (talk) 06:47, 15 June 2012 (UTC)

Better? It's a bit tricky because the transition from cold to warm depends on the spatial scale under consideration. Art Carlson (talk) 07:38, 15 June 2012 (UTC)