Talk:Po' boy

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject United States / Louisiana / New Orleans (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject United States, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of topics relating to the United States of America on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the ongoing discussions.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject Louisiana.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject Louisiana - New Orleans (marked as Mid-importance).
 
WikiProject Food and drink (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Food and drink, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of food and drink related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
Checklist icon
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
 

a baguette by any other name[edit]

wtf is a "traditional American baguette" and how does it differ from, say, a traditional French baguette? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 98.163.238.118 (talk) 07:39, 21 May 2009 (UTC) american breads are normaly mass produced where as french breads are baked daily the day old bread is made into french toast? Redchaos75 (talk) 16:23, 29 April 2010 (UTC)

French Fry Po Boy[edit]

No mention of French Fry Po Boys? Althought they are not as common as seafood or roast beef, French Fry Po Boys are traditional po boys and deserved to be mentioned (some claim that they are the original po boy, but I don't have a source). If no one objects, I will add it. Jean15paul (talk) 18:10, 1 October 2008 (UTC)

Today's edits[edit]

Added Leidenheimer's link and Blake Ponchartrain link. Added "Clovis" to "Benny Martin". Wondering: are we using "po' boy" in this article, or "po-boy" or "po boy" or what? I used "po' boy" and I may have changed a couple other uses for the sake of consistency. Zeno Izen 21:12, 5 June 2006 (UTC)

I think there is another use for the expression po boy and it means doing things on the very cheap whilst doing research...HP refer to it as "Skunking"

History of the word 'po-boy"[edit]

I've read some accounts (unfortunately don't remember exactly where) that the word "po-boy" came from sandwiches served to workers on a public project (in the 1800's?) when, because of a lack of meat and/or to keep costs low, the sandwiches were prepared with french fries for filling. Anyone know anything about this? Thanks.rich 18:35, 22 November 2006 (UTC)

"pour boire" means "to drink", it is most commonly used in reference to a tip given to a waiter. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 75.43.215.149 (talk) 21:59, 11 December 2008 (UTC)

Baguette?[edit]

Is New Orleans-style French bread a baguette? I thought baguettes were harder than New Orleans French bread, without the soft "insides". rich 09:27, 9 September 2007 (UTC)

Louisiana French bread[edit]

I've added tags to the discussion of Louisiana French bread. This all sounds like original research, and it is also self-contradicting. The bread is described both as "dense and chewy" and "light and airy." It can't be both. Also, French bread varies tremendously all over the world--qualifying statements seem to be in order.


French bread exists all over the world? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 84.165.214.73 (talk) 18:05, 30 July 2009 (UTC)

po' boy 'press'[edit]

Weren't there "po' boy press" appliances that heat the po'boy? I am seem to recall them being used at shops around NOLa and Biloxi. They would literally press the po boy like an iron to heat the po' boy. Jacksinterweb (talk) 01:36, 17 December 2007 (UTC)

That sounds very vaguely familiar. I will ask around my family and see what they say.rich (talk) 21:45, 13 January 2008 (UTC)


History of the word "po-boy" (redux)[edit]

I find the suggestion that the fact that Po'boy is a natural dialect contraction of "poor boy" needs a citation laughable at best.

Lacking?[edit]

This article severly lacks sources as though knowledge of the po boy was divenly given.Not only this but this article is far too short to describe what the po boy is all about.Needs fixing fast.Wikimakesmart (talk) 14:59, 29 August 2010 (UTC)


WTF?[edit]

"Soft shell crab, catfish, crawfish, eyeballs, Silver Jews, no, butt, Louisiana hot sausage, roast beef and gravy, and French fries are other common variations."

"Eyeballs, silver Jews, no, butt?"

Are you monitoring this? This stuff either needs to be deleted or explained. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 74.10.198.104 (talk) 19:37, 28 October 2010 (UTC)

It's Not Po Boy it's Poor Boy and you have the recipe wrong[edit]

I grew up with my parents who are always right calling it a Poor Boy and the sandwich was a grilled cheese with bologna — Preceding unsigned comment added by 50.104.95.18 (talk) 16:37, 18 November 2012 (UTC)

Po' boy is derived from pourboire[edit]

The article had completely omitted the (generally-accepted) fact that "po' boy" is derived from the French term pourboire. In the non-rhotic English used in New Orleans, the connection between pourboire and po' boy is obvious. I've added this in. The mystery about the origin of the term is not its etymology, but as to how it came to be applied to a sandwich. The etymology is straightforward. 71.205.174.204 (talk) 16:19, 29 December 2012 (UTC)

Still not clear on what makes this something other than a sub[edit]

So I'm heading to New Orleans soon, and wanted to know what makes a Po'boy different from a sub - all this article gives me is "A key ingredient that differentiates po' boys from other submarine sandwiches is the bread." Unfortunately, no details on what makes the bread so special - that section just talks about how long the bread is. A section that describes why the sandwich is noteworthy would be great. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 31.6.53.45 (talk) 08:24, 20 April 2014 (UTC)