Talk:Pombaline style

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Question[edit]

Did this style have any influence in Portugal's colonies? Are there any examples in Brazil, Angola, Mozambique etc.? --Mcginnly | Natter 14:23, 19 January 2007 (UTC)

Interesting point. The Grove mentions the work of Landi at Belém, Brazil as being (perhaps) influenced by the Pombaline style. It seems a good bet Brazilian neoclassicism owes some sort of debt to Lisbon. Twospoonfuls 17:21, 19 January 2007 (UTC)

Sources[edit]

Interesting article - but there aren't any sources. It looks like a private study rather than a wikipedia article. One point I am particularly interested in is whether the Pombal design is really all that seismically resistant. My feeling is that it is not. I will see if I can get anything on this. Muchado (talk) 05:18, 7 January 2010 (UTC)

There is detailed info about the anti-seismic features of Manuel de Maia's designs in Nicholas Shrady's book about Lisbon Earthquake: The Last Day: Wrath, Ruin, and Reason in the Great Lisbon Earthquake of 1755, Nicholas Shrady, Penguin, 2008. [1] Mick gold (talk) 06:47, 10 April 2010 (UTC)