Talk:Pope

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Former featured article candidate Pope is a former featured article candidate. Please view the links under Article milestones below to see why the nomination failed. For older candidates, please check the archive.
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February 3, 2005 Featured article candidate Not promoted
June 3, 2006 Peer review Reviewed
Current status: Former featured article candidate
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Hello?[edit]

In the section Monarchical episcopate, what does the information presented have to do with the caption? It does not mention monarchy. Wouldn't this better apply to a section re the Papal States? If it means to suggest some pre-eminence of status, than perhaps another phrase would be clearer. Mannanan51 (talk) 20:26, 16 July 2014 (UTC)


Correction for external links to Catholic.com[edit]

Dear Wiki Admin, In the write protected article https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pope Can you please fix the existing broken links in the External links https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pope#External_links

Broken links

The correct links are listed below

End of correction

Please also review my article which includes solid references to scriptures and vast compelling references to the early church all before 400AD.

http://www.4unity.net/the-bishop-of-rome/ Please include this in the external links page

With Thanks Daniel Skilling Dskilli (talk) 12:14, 1 September 2014 (UTC)

Yellow check.svg Partly done: I corrected the existing links. I didn't bother to include your article, but if someone else wants to that's fine. Elizium23 (talk) 13:58, 1 September 2014 (UTC)

Roman Catholic[edit]

Hi, It would be more according to reality if the word 'catholic' would be augmented and cited of mentioned as 'Roman catholic', because there is more than one catholic church. The pope presides the 'roman' type of catholicism. Thank you. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 87.212.130.82 (talk) 11:26, 30 September 2014 (UTC)

This has been discussed to death already over the years. Catholic Church is the proper term because that is the organization's name and it is the largest, most well known organization with that name. Also, there are 23 rites of the Catholic Church in communion with the pope that are decidedly NOT "Roman" and take great offense to being called such.

Anglicized birth names[edit]

In many biographies of Popes, their birth names are Anglicized. This happens occasionally in modern works (1, 2, 3, 4, 5); and is nearly universal in works written before the First World War. (1, 2, 3, 4, 5).

Therefore I am adding the Anglicized birth name of every Pope as a footnote the first time their birth name is mentioned.

Bobby Martnen (talk) 02:11, 31 December 2014 (UTC)

Protected status[edit]

This page has been semi-protected for 3 years now. Long enough, I think, time to end protection.

Bad references, irrelevant data, and linguistic confusion[edit]

This article needs serious revision. The word "Pope" is equivocated badly through out the article. At one point the word means "father" the next it means "the leader of the worldwide Catholic Church." When The word "bishop" is used, it is equivocated to mean "Pope (the leader of the worldwide Catholic Church)." The Early church had many different locations that had bishops. See Eusebius Pamphilus Ecclesiastical History, "The Bishops of Rome, Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem, mentioned by Eusebius" page 466 Hendrickson Publishers ISBN 978-1-56563-371-1.


There are numerous bad references in this article. Here are examples from section "Early Christianity (c. 30–325)":

Bad reference

"They also cite the importance accorded to the popes in the ecumenical councils, including the early ones."[44] Broken Link therefore no reference [citation needed]

Harrison, Brian W. (January 1991). "Papal Authority at the Earliest Councils". This Rock (Catholic Answers) 2 (1). Retrieved 22 May 2013.

Irrelevant data, says nothing about a Pope

In the early Christian era, Rome and a few other cities had claims on the leadership of worldwide Church. James the Just, known as "the brother of the Lord", served as head of the Jerusalem church, which is still honored as the "Mother Church" in Orthodox tradition. Alexandria had been a center of Jewish learning and became a center of Christian learning. Rome had a large congregation early in the apostolic period whom Paul the Apostle addressed in his Epistle to the Romans, and according to tradition Paul was martyred there.

No Citation, other church locations were of great importance also

During the 1st century of the Church (ca. 30–130), the Roman capital became recognized as a Christian center of exceptional importance. [citation needed]

No Citation. What other references?

However, there are only a few other references of that time to recognition of the authoritative primacy of the Roman See outside of Rome.[citation needed]

Irrelevant data

Clement I, at the end of the 1st century, wrote an epistle to the Church in Corinth intervening in a major dispute, and apologizing for not having taken action earlier.[45] [citation needed]

The following quote does not offer any data or evidence about a pope in early Christianity and is a biased source

In the Ravenna Document of 13 October 2007, theologians chosen by the Roman Catholic and the Eastern Orthodox Churches stated: "41. Both sides agree...that Rome, as the Church that 'presides in love' according to the phrase of St Ignatius of Antioch,[46] occupied the first place in the taxis, and that the bishop of Rome was therefore the protos among the patriarchs. They disagree, however, on the interpretation of the historical evidence from this era regarding the prerogatives of the Bishop of Rome as protos, a matter that was already understood in different ways in the first millennium."

The following quote says nothing of a pope. Only the status of a church, therefore is irrelevant

In the late 2nd century AD, there were more manifestations of Roman authority over other churches. In 189, assertion of the primacy of the Church of Rome may be indicated in Irenaeus's Against Heresies (3:3:2): "With [the Church of Rome], because of its superior origin, all the churches must agree...and it is in her that the faithful everywhere have maintained the apostolic tradition."

The proof of a "Pope" in early church was never established. The following uses "Pope Victor I" as if we were convinced that there was a "Pope (the leader of the worldwide Catholic Church)" during this time. Also, there is no citation stating Victor I was called "Pope"

In AD 195, Pope Victor I, in what is seen as an exercise of Roman authority over other churches, excommunicated the Quartodecimans for observing Easter on the 14th of Nisan, the date of the Jewish Passover, a tradition handed down by John the Evangelist (see Easter controversy). Celebration of Easter on a Sunday, as insisted on by the pope, is the system that has prevailed (see computus).[citation needed]


This article in its entirety is biased towards a religious view point found in the Roman catholic church and not on generally accepted christian facts.