Talk:Pope Nicholas V

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When did the papal schism end really?[edit]

No, this page has since been corrected. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Storm talk (talkcontribs) 23:40, 28 July 2011 (UTC)

This page has this pope put an end to the papal schism, but the page it refers to says it was ended decades earlier. Was this some second papal schism? Martijn Faassen 21:41, 9 July 2005 (UTC)

Second sentence, second paragraph[edit]

Sentence corrected and clarified on July 28, 2011.

I cannot make an understanding of this, "His father died... etc.", so have desisted from any editing. It appears to be two (perhaps more) seperate sentences clumsily merged into one. It awaits someone with more patience and skill than me.LessHeard vanU 19:00, 14 October 2006 (UTC)

Mention in Dante's Inferno?[edit]

I found this page after seeing Pope Nicholas V mentioned in the preface to a passage from Date's Inferno, though I can't actually find the mention in the poem's text itself (haven't read it closely yet). Could be a typo? Since there are footnotes describing references to Nicholas III. Warrants a further look, at the least. [[1]] Yuletide (talk) 23:19, 14 March 2008 (UTC)

Dante Alighieri died in 1321. Nicholas V was born in 1397. They were not contemporaries. Pope Nicholas III however does appear in Malebolge and was waiting for the arrival of companions in the persons of Pope Boniface VIII and Pope Clement V. You might have mistaken Nicholas V for either of the three. Dimadick (talk) 06:19, 15 March 2008 (UTC)

Two Papal style boxes[edit]

There were two infoboxes using the Template:Infobox pope styles with the only difference being different pictures for the two. I have surrounded the old with comment tags so it is still there if the need arises. I cannot see why there would be two seemingly contradicting pictures, however if someone else knows better which one should actually belong please correct me. Thanks,  Adwiii  Talk  01:56, 27 October 2011 (UTC)

File:Paus Nicolaas V door Peter Paul Rubens.jpg to appear as POTD[edit]

Hello! This is a note to let the editors of this article know that File:Paus Nicolaas V door Peter Paul Rubens.jpg will be appearing as picture of the day on June 30, 2013. You can view and edit the POTD blurb at Template:POTD/2013-06-30. If this article needs any attention or maintenance, it would be preferable if that could be done before its appearance on the Main Page. Thanks! — Crisco 1492 (talk) 23:21, 13 June 2013 (UTC)

Picture of the day
Pope Nicholas V

Pope Nicholas V (1397–1455) was the head of the Catholic Church from 6 March 1447 until his death. Born Tommaso Parentucelli at Sarzana, Italy, he served as a diplomat, Bishop of Bologna, and cardinal before being elected pope in 1447. He took the name "Nicholas" in honour of his early benefactor, Niccolò Albergati, and is the last pope to have taken the name. During Nicholas' reign, in which he encouraged humanists, Constantinople was conquered by the Ottoman Turks. This portrait by Rubens was painted in 1610–12.

Painting: Peter Paul Rubens
ArchiveMore featured pictures...


Neutral?[edit]

Paragraphs 5-10 of the biography are almost adulatory. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Egospoon (talkcontribs) 00:35, 2 July 2013 (UTC)

Certainly, to me at least, the most inportant parts of this mans rule are these few paragraphs found in his biography, and some of them require some answers!;

"But the works on which Nicholas V especially set his heart were the rebuilding of the Vatican, the Borgo district, and St Peter's Basilica, where the reborn glories of the papacy were to be focused.

He got as far as pulling down part of the ancient basilica, made some alterations to the Lateran Palace (of which some frescos by Fra Angelico bear witness), and laid up 2,522 cartloads of marble from the dilapidated Colosseum for use in the later constructions."

So, just what parts of the "ancient basilica" were pulled down?

"Under the generous patronage of Nicholas V, humanism made rapid strides as well. The new humanist learning had been hitherto looked on with suspicion in Rome, a possible source of schism and heresy from an unhealthy interest in paganism. For Nicholas V, humanism became a tool for the cultural aggrandizement of the Christian capital, and he sent emissaries to the East to attract Greek scholars after the fall of Constantinople.[7] The pope also employed Lorenzo Valla to translate Greek histories,[8] pagan as well as Christian, into Latin. This industry, coming just before the dawn of printing, contributed enormously to the sudden expansion of the intellectual horizon."

So just whom was Lorenzo Valla? How does he compare to other translators of the era? And the arrival of printing means a great deal!

"Nicholas V, with assistance from Enoch of Ascoli and Giovanni Tortelli, founded a library of nine thousand volumes, including manuscripts rescued from the Turks after the fall of Constantinople. The Pope himself was a man of vast erudition, and his friend Aeneas Silvius Piccolomini, later Pope Pius II, said of him that "what he does not know is outside the range of human knowledge."

So, does anyone know just how many of these "nine thosand volums" reamain to be seen?

Perhaps there exist no real answers to my questions? 96.19.159.196 (talk) 21:19, 19 August 2013 (UTC)Ronald L.Hughes

I'm sure there are, but they would initially be found, if anywhere, in other articles on these subjects. Johnbod (talk) 01:37, 20 August 2013 (UTC)