Talk:Poverty in China

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The opening intro section,

1) Seems a bit too long; 2) Plagiarises this article.

http://www-wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/IW3P/IB/2007/06/13/000016406_20070613095018/Rendered/PDF/wps4253.pdfSits69 (talk) 14:10, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

How poor is 1,25$?[edit]

Hey guys, serious question. How poor are they really? How much are basic commodities? Do they have access to doctors/medical care? Can everyone afford to send their kids to a school? I cannot imagine living on 1,25$ a day. How do they manage? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 80.132.126.25 (talk) 22:26, 11 January 2013 (UTC)

REAL poverty in China[edit]

35% of China's population is leaving on less than 2$ a day(10% <1$ a day which is according to IMF extreme poverty). And I think the real number of people leaving in poverty is significantly higher than that... So I hope someone will put true numbers in this article.

That's interesting, where did you get that figure? I made some small changes to the lead. I'm not sure if this is the way to go about it, but it's just what I thought would be appropriate. Thanks. —Preceding unsigned comment added by TheSoundAndTheFury (talkcontribs) 15:39, 14 February 2010 (UTC)


Article stinks of appologist propaganda. No where does it state, or even estimate how many people are IN rural poverty, but keeps crowing about how many are out of it. Let's see some numbers here, please, even if they are liberal lies. Poor presentation. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 214.13.212.132 (talk) 13:52, 7 July 2011 (UTC)

References to the trade surplus are confusing. Couldn't China temper the urban boom by reducing its funding of Western extravagance and thus have more resources to meet other needs? The surplus would then be part of the solution. [Jorgen Harmse] — Preceding unsigned comment added by 108.178.95.74 (talk) 15:45, 15 November 2012 (UTC)

Definition of poverty[edit]

I am going to adjust the definition of poverty given in the lede sentence, as most of the article's content regarding the nature and impacts of poverty have no connection with the precise number of $1.25/day, but rather to a general state of material deprivation, which may be measured in either absolute or relative terms.Homunculus (duihua) 14:28, 8 October 2011 (UTC)