Talk:Publicity

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WikiProject Journalism (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
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WikiProject Business (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
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I haven't been able to locate any source to corroborate the assertion that Paris Hilton's public behavior has boosted business at Hilton Hotels. Can someone provide that? If the assertion is only speculation, then perhaps it should be replaced with another example. Chonak 02:28, 28 April 2006 (UTC)

Under "publicists", the link on "clients" now goes to Consumer, according to the disambiguation change Drable added today. If I understand this aright, Drable has another interpretation of the sentence from mine, which I hadn't considered.

Publicists usually work at large companies handling multiple clients could mean either of these: (a) Publicists usually work at large advertising and public relations firms.... (b) Publicists usually work at large mass-market companies....

Under interpretation (a), "consumer" probably isn't the ideal word to use to designate the customers of a PR firm; but of course it would be just right for (b).

Can we try to find out which of (a) and (b) is true, and clarify the sentence? One possible source of information might be the Occupational Outlook Handbook. Chonak 15:58, 1 May 2006 (UTC)