Talk:Quatrefoil

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What Christian symbolism?[edit]

The opening sentence of the article says: "In art, architecture, and traditional Christian symbolism...", but there is no explanation or elaboration of the use of quatrefoils in Christian symbolism in the article. Is there one, or is this just an assumption because of the use of the trefoil to symbolize the trinity and the popularity of quatrefoils in Gothic period of European art and architecture? If someone has information on the symbolic usage in medieval and early modern European Christian art, it would really help the article.TheCormac (talk) 22:02, 12 March 2014 (UTC)

"The figure is symbolic of the four evangelists, the four Gospels, the four Greek doctors (Athanasius, Basil the Great, John Chrysostom, and Gregory of Nazianzus), and the four Latin fathers (Jerome, Ambrose, Augustine of Hippo, and Gregory the Great)." -- Our Christian Symbols by Friedrich Rest (ISBN 0-8298-0099-9), p. 36.
Does that answer your question? -- AnonMoos (talk) 04:48, 13 March 2014 (UTC)