Talk:Rōnin

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Disambiguation[edit]

This page really should be a disambiguation. There are now three "Ronin" articles on Wikipedia.



Does the "Ronin the Hacker" section really belong here? -- Schultz.Ryan


Why not the definition "Students who flucked the college education". Is it too cultural? --TakuyaMurata

Is this a Japanese cultural item? If so, then sure, it's fine to include it, but please mark it as a Japanese term. When I deleted it, I thought it was somebody being funny. -- Zoe


>Rōnin could also be that which is referred to as a rurouni which is a samurai who lost his path or is alone a wanderer at best or a rōshi (浪士).

"rurouni" is fiction term.Rurouni Kenshin onry term.Nobuhiro Watsuki's coinage(mintage).

Wave man vs. Tide man. In the article, the kanji character means flowing with the tide. So Ronin literally means a wanderer.

If it wasn't a historically used term, though, it should probably be deleted. If there aren't any objections, I think I'm going to do that. Idekii 02:21, 16 August 2005 (UTC)

I have now deleted it. Idekii 03:49, 21 September 2005 (UTC)


すみません。本文に書きたかったことを日本語で書きます。

「浪人」の正式な呼び方は「過年度生」です。これは「過年度卒業生」、「過年度卒業者」、「既卒者」という言葉で呼ばれることもあります。(ただし、「既卒者」だけは他の意味に使われる場合もあります)

「浪人」という言葉は、日本人のほとんどが、武士・学生の両方の意味で知っています。しかし、「過年度生」という言葉は、教育に詳しい人でなければ知っていない場合が多いです。

「過年度生」という言葉の意味は、「過去の年度に卒業した生徒」です。つまり「学校をすでに卒業した人」という意味です。

「浪人」は入学試験で不合格になった人だけを意味します。しかし「過年度生」は、不合格になった人も含めますが、その他にも、病気やケガのために療養(お休み)していた人なども含めます。


My Kanji skills aren't perfect but I will help translate. What this person is saying is when refering to ronin students it should be noted ronin in this context is colloquial. Also ronin can be used for anyone who has lost or quit their job. and can also be used on a person who is sick or on medical leave from work(jokingly?). --WNS 08:40, 19 May 2007 (UTC)

I (liberally) translated the above bit for reference; the gist is in bold:
I would have liked to contribute to the article, but instead I will write in Japanese here.
The formal expression for "rounin" is "former [high-school] graduate" (過年度生 lit. "past-year-student", note it doesn't mention "high school" but I used it in the translation to convey the probably derogatory meaning of someone whose crown achievement is having completed a lower level of education). This is sometimes also called "previous-year alumnus", "previous-year graduate", "already-graduated-person" (loose translations), etc. (Please note that the latter, "already-graduated-person" (既卒者), is the only one which happens to be also used in a different sense.) (does not specify which different sense)
For a Japanese speaker, the word "rounin" can be used to mean "warrior", or to mean "student". If that same speaker is uneducated, however, he may not be familiar with the expression "former [high-school] graduate" (過年度生).
The expression "former [high-school] graduate" is used for "a student who graduated in a past school year". In other words, "a person who has already graduated from school".
The expression "rounin" is only used for a person who failed to pass the entrance examination. By contrast, "former [high-school] graduate" can have the same meaning, but it can also designate people who failed to enroll for other reasons, such as illness or injury. 92.114.207.115 (talk) 23:40, 9 May 2010 (UTC)

This sentence doesn't make any sense: "the suicide rates of modern-day ronin are significantly higher than their contemporaries."

"modern-day" and "contemporary" are synonymous. I suspect that "contemporaries" should be changed, but I don't have the original source, so I don't know if the sentence would be true...of course, the source should be sited, anyway... 208.17.208.253 13:17, 19 Apr 2005 (UTC)


I have deleted Rurouni Kenshin from the article because the character was not a wondering Samurai, but just a wondering swordsman, former assassin, that mastered a style of sword play called the "Hetan Mitsurugi style". Kenshin was never born into a samurai class nor did he ever belong to any shogunate. --Will

May I ask on what grounds is rounin translated as "wave man"? 浪 also means "wandering" (http://nuthatch.com/kanji/demo/6d6a.html), which definitely seems more appropriate. To substantiate this, here is another example: 浮浪者 ("vagrant"), which also uses 浪. 92.114.207.115 (talk) 23:43, 9 May 2010 (UTC)

Added pictures[edit]

I decided to add two pictures to the article. They make the page look pretty nice now. --Kross 07:29, May 16, 2005 (UTC)

The one from Forty-seven Ronin was my first picture on Wikipedia, fifty-one weeks ago. It does make good sense on Ronin too. Fg2 08:14, May 16, 2005 (UTC)

3 Dec. 2005 What is a wondering samurai?

I was "wondering" the same thing myself, (It's a typo, silly!) --Roninbk 13:28, 7 September 2006 (UTC)

ronin in ancient periods[edit]

The word 浪人 rōnin came from 浮浪人 furōnin, furō meaning "floating on waves" or "drifting with waves". The sentence "The word ronin literally means "wave man" - one who is tossed about, as on the waves in the sea." is a good explanation of this, but adding the word "furo" might help readers understand better?

I am afraid that "serf" might not be a proper word to be used here. Farmers were bound to the assigned lands, but they were not transfered with the lands as was the case for serfs, I suppose? --LittleTree 13:17, 31 July 2006 (UTC)

Ronin Warriors[edit]

LoL its not a "Anime Influenced cartoon" its made by Sunrise the animation arm of the Japanese toy giant Bandai Ronin Warriors is a legitimate shonen anime produced in japan. --68.160.181.246 20:58, 7 March 2007 (UTC)

This is very true. Ronin Warriors is the western name of the anime "Yoroiden Samurai Torupa," or "Legendary Armor Samurai Troopers." It is not an anime-influenced cartoon but a legitimate anime in its own right, which makes the article inaccurate in that particular entry. Trisar 01:57, 2 April 2007 (UTC)

interesting piece[edit]

Quote from editor above who deleted Rurouni Kenshin from the article because the character was not a wondering Samurai, but just a wondering swordsman, former assassin, that mastered a style of sword play called the "Hetan Mitsurugi style". Kenshin was never born into a samurai class nor did he ever belong to any shogunate. This is so interesting - can it be placed somewhere? Is there an article on Rurouni? Also, the word "drifter" exists in English though it doesn't have positive meaning, but "freelance" comes close. A mercenary is a freelance soldier - is that Ronin? Julia Rossi 04:20, 10 March 2007 (UTC)

Etymology: Contradiction[edit]

The introducing paragraph provide completely different information:


I'm sorry not to have resources to find a solution. I can only warn you.--Quinceps 00:58, 26 March 2007 (UTC)



This page uses biased language unbecoming of a scholarly article[edit]

for example: "Ronin were the epitome of self-determination; independent men who dictated their own path in life, answering only to themselves and making decisions as they saw fit. It is easy to understand why some hated them for this." "Epitome" and "easy to understand" are opinions subject to the views of each individual. Also "some" in the last sentence is very ambiguous, some could be three people or three hundred thousand. —Preceding unsigned comment added by [[User:{{{1}}}|{{{1}}}]] ([[User talk:{{{1}}}|talk]] • [[Special:Contributions/{{{1}}}|contribs]])

Oibara seppuku[edit]

Isn't this usually referred to as 'junshi', which was eventually banned, in 1664 according to one source. 5 May 2007

For reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Junshi

also "hara kiri" traslated means 'stomach cutting' so its meaning could vary if you are going to use it in this context then at least the kanji should be shown as well: 腹切り sence its a reverse of the proper kanji for ritual suicide(seppuku)切腹 --WNS 08:10, 19 May 2007 (UTC)

Status and history[edit]

The separate sections each appear to provide information on both status and history. Could they be improved upon without combining the sections?--Kenneth M Burke 01:57, 18 September 2007 (UTC)

Why the line above the 'o'?[edit]

Any reason for the special 'o'? Gil_mo (talk) 09:07, 19 October 2010 (UTC)

The macron over the 'o' is a convention of the modern Hepburn system of writing Japanese words using letters of the Latin alphabet and in this case denotes a slightly longer long-o sound. Boneyard90 (talk) 02:15, 27 April 2011 (UTC)