Talk:Rabies virus

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Gurbir Sekhon was an example of the Lyssavirus for rabies.

the drawing of the virus particle is influenza, not rabies — Preceding unsigned comment added by 134.126.101.193 (talk) 14:48, 10 October 2012 (UTC)

the picture of virus est the good?

http://www.expasy.org/viralzone/all_by_species/22.html

--bc789 (talk) 03:36, 31 May 2009 (UTC)

they look like harri —Preceding unsigned comment added by 81.134.128.242 (talk) 19:26, 10 November 2009 (UTC)

I was wondering if this articles should incorporated the Rabies article? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.234.222.77 (talk) 03:18, 30 March 2011 (UTC)

it is not appropriate. Rabies is the disease caused by infection of rabies virus. this also applies to influenza and influenza virus. when in the disease article the wiki editors will focus on the symptoms and epidemiology, while in the virus article they will focus on the virology, scientific findings, taxonomy etc. -meaningless (talk) 15:55, 20 May 2012 (UTC)

Why is there little to no mention of the physical effects of rabies? I don't see any reference to aggression or fear of water. 99.41.114.22 (talk) 19:06, 10 June 2011 (UTC)

Because this article is about the virus that causes rabies, not rabies itself. Please refer to the link at the top of page in order to get there.

There's one thing that bugs me to no avail: How is the rabies virus able to infect several different species? I thought each species of virus could infect only one species. Could someone please post an explanation for this? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.173.98.40 (talk) 23:21, 23 January 2012 (UTC)

for virus infection, it depends on the receptor of the host. it is not surprising that different species share similar or same receptors in their body. this is another reason why some viruses will affect only specific part of the body. actually this have been included in the virus article and you can take a look.
"The range of host cells that a virus can infect is called its "host range". This can be narrow or, as when a virus is capable of infecting many species, broad." and inside the article there is a reference link. meaningless (talk) 15:50, 20 May 2012 (UTC)

puzzling issue--rabies article says it was known in ancient mesopotamia[edit]

"Because of its potentially violent nature, rabies has been known since circa 2000 B.C.[62] The first written record of rabies is in the Mesopotamian Codex of Eshnunna (circa 1930 BC), which dictates that the owner of a dog showing symptoms of rabies should take preventive measure against bites. If another person were bitten by a rabid dog and later died, the owner was heavily fined."

but THIS article says

"All extant rabies viruses appear to have evolved within the last 1500 years.[13] Consequently, the emergence of rabies may have been contemporaneous with the extreme weather events of 535–536 and/or the eruption of Krakatoa"

This is not necessarily a contradiction since there might have been rabies viruses thart are no longer extant, or the ancient mesopotamian references could be to something else. But it would be best to note the apparent contradiction.76.218.104.120 (talk) 10:04, 5 August 2012 (UTC)

Replication paragraph[edit]

I had to remove the paragraph "Replication" because it was a 1:1 copy of the text found at http://www.austincc.edu/microbio/2421c/rv.htm inserted here. If this is by error, please reply here. Greetings --hroest 14:25, 22 January 2013 (UTC)

Lifespan of the virus outside host[edit]

I was informed the saliva of a host containing the virus is 'dangerous' up to three hours outside the host. Is there any info confirming or arguing this? From what I know of viruses, they can survive outside a host indefinitely and are always dangerous.74.14.84.43 (talk) 11:04, 30 January 2013 (UTC)