Talk:Radar jamming and deception

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High traffic

On 20 November 2013, Radar jamming and deception was linked from Slashdot, a high-traffic website. (See visitor traffic)

Discussion[edit]

I add a no references tag. I also add a stub tag; this topic is huge and the article can be expanded dramatically.--C6H12O6 14:46, 1 December 2006 (UTC)


The statement "However, most products called radar jammers on the market do not effectively jam police radar guns but can cause an error reading giving the user time to respond (by slowing down in the case of speed guns)" needs verification. To my knowledge this is not true. If this statement alludes to the legal Rocky Mountain Radar "passive scramblers" i.e. "Phaser II", then it should just say it plain don't work. (See radarjammers.com for many reliable testing sources and videos of the product failing to produce an effect). If the statement refers to real jammers (illegal) such as the Scorpion, etc, they do actually jam radar. When used, they will scramble doppler tone and produce no readout, according to Speed Measurement Lab tests (http://www.radarbusters.com/activeradarjamtestsarticle.cfm) -- this sounds to me like real jamming, not just producing error readout.

Agreed, I believe the author was confusing radar jammers with laser jammers when he/she talked about the jammer cause an error reading. I reworded and cited two sources. --Aka042 (talk) 21:07, 8 December 2008 (UTC)