Talk:Radiohead

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Featured article Radiohead is a featured article; it (or a previous version of it) has been identified as one of the best articles produced by the Wikipedia community. Even so, if you can update or improve it, please do so.
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band members[edit]

why the hell was the band members section deleted? i was helping to make the page better and ye deleted it! fuck sake

Picture[edit]

Is it just a problem with my computer/browser or is the picture like, huge? I mean, it's wider than the article... I don't know if there's something wrong with the way it's displaying on my computer or if someone made it that way, but it's so big it takes over most of my screen and it goes into the menu on the left... — Preceding unsigned comment added by 50.54.221.0 (talk) 01:58, 12 February 2012 (UTC)

New ticketing[edit]

Should we include information about the new ticketing system for the UK tour? Is this notable enough? --TravisBernard (talk) 16:20, 5 March 2012 (UTC)

IMO no. Popcornduff (talk) 14:32, 22 April 2012 (UTC)

Radiohead is britpop[edit]

They are britpop, they were one of the first britpop bands so they should be labeled as britpop — Preceding unsigned comment added by 89.141.5.47 (talk) 11:28, 22 April 2012 (UTC)

Where's your evidence? Popcornduff (talk) 12:26, 22 April 2012 (UTC)
Their earlier music was against the conventional Britpop. Myxomatosis75 (talk) 09:46, 10 September 2012 (UTC)
The Smiths was perhaps the first. Regards.--Kürbis () 11:02, 10 September 2012 (UTC)
Actually, The Smiths was just an influence. First Britpop bands were formed in the early 1990s, as a backlash towards the popularity of American alternative rock movements such as Seattle Sound. Neverthless, The Smiths disbanded just before the movement actually emerged. And for the Radiohead, they can't be Britpop because of their strong influences from the notable American bands such as Pixies, R.E.M. and Sonic Youth (They were also influenced by Joy Division, The Beatles and The Smiths, though.) Their earlier sound was even tended towards grunge.Myxomatosis75 (talk) 18:31, 10 September 2012 (UTC)
Indeed. I read at least one article that suggested part of RH's longevity came from them dodging the Britpop bubble entirely - so when it popped, they weren't one of the casualties. Can't be bothered to dig up the source atm though - just making conversation. Popcornduff (talk) 21:19, 10 September 2012 (UTC)
Regardless of what they are, it seems strange to call them merely a 'rock' band in the opening sentence since they have such an eclectic sound. Pretty much nothing that they've recorded since OK Computer could even possibly be classed as rock. I don't really have any better suggestions, but maybe somebody can think of a better way to describe them? I should add that I'm not trying to criticise the article since in general it's fantastic but I just think that this could possibly be worded better.Core1911 (talk) 23:54, 21 March 2013 (UTC)
They're certainly a rock band, but only in that "rock" is such an enormous umbrella genre that any collection of musicians with guitars and drums is a rock band. I think it'd be a little better to specify that they're an alternative rock band, though the term is hardly less woolly...
As for Radiohead rock songs post-OKC? Erm, most of Hail to the Thief and In Rainbows would meet that definition without controversy. Popcornduff (talk) 11:17, 22 March 2013 (UTC)
OK, we probably just have different definitions of 'rock' music. It's not really a big deal anyway, I suppose the majority of their music could be considered to be rock depending on your stance. Core1911 (talk) 22:11, 23 March 2013 (UTC)
Now I'm curious - would you really say There There, Bodysnatchers, Go to Sleep or Jigsaw Falling Into Place aren't rock songs? Popcornduff (talk) 22:13, 23 March 2013 (UTC)
I wasn't really thinking about specific songs, more their overall style, but I suppose those would fit in as being rock songs. I'd also heard TY claim that he 'hates rock music' in a post-OKC interview but it's probably not substantial. The interview is 'Reflections on Kid A' if you're interested, I doubt you haven't seen it.Core1911 (talk) 22:15, 23 March 2013 (UTC)
Yorke's bashed rock music a lot over the years, but no one can be as big a Smiths, Pixies or REM fan as he is - or make the records he has - and actually literally "hate rock". In the case of that interview, I believe he was (in a typically sardonic way) protesting the ugly, self-destructive, hyper-masculine mythos of rock music (and its mounting musical cliches), and expressing his desire to disassociate from it.
I'm interested in hearing why you think Hail to the Thief or In Rainbows aren't obviously rock albums but OKC is. I don't think OKC is any less unconventional or "experimental" with texture and form than those albums. Doesn't really have a whole lot more traditional guitar-bass-drums isntrumentation either. (I'd say all their albums are rock albums by the way, but IR and HTTT are easier to hold up as obvious examples.)Popcornduff (talk) 22:44, 23 March 2013 (UTC)
I think I was slightly unclear, but in my initial post I mean that anything from Kid A onwards (post OKC)(in my opinion) is more electronic/experimental than rock. It's such an ambiguous term, but I just feel that from Kid A onwards they diverted and became significantly more experimental. I agree with your sentiment regarding that interview and to be honest I took it out of context slightly, but I just feel that since The Bends and to a lesser extent OKC they haven't really fit with the archetypes of a rock band. Regardless, it's not very important for the article in the grand scheme of things. Would you consider TKOL to be rock music, out of interest?Core1911 (talk) 23:39, 23 March 2013 (UTC)
Sure. It's still rock first and foremost - guitars and basslines and choruses - it just has a lot of electronic production blended in. I don't like the term "experimental" when applied to Radiohead, btw - they're nowhere near as abstract as people make them out to be, and it's such a flabby term. But we still have "experimental" listed in the genre of many of their albums. Ho hum. Popcornduff (talk) 09:18, 24 March 2013 (UTC)

I think its a good thing. I think to describe Kid A without mentioning that it was experimental is just being irresponsible. JR — Preceding unsigned comment added by 90.214.161.15 (talk) 22:36, 24 September 2013 (UTC)

Edit request on 22 July 2012[edit]

Not done: please be more specific about what needs to be changed.--Canoe1967 (talk) 00:53, 23 July 2012 (UTC)

Equipment[edit]

Guitar Rig & Signal Flow[edit]

  • A detailed gear diagram of Jonny Greenwod's 1997 Radiohead "OK Computer" Tour guitar rig can be found here: [1] [2]


Jetpack66 (talk) 23:33, 22 July 2012 (UTC)

The King Of Limbs Section[edit]

I can't help but feel that The King of Limbs and 'physical movements' section has become a little bloated and is contributing to the overall massive length of the page significantly. It's also got several declarations that I feel could do with extra citations, and seem a little bit like the author's own opinion rather than necessarily factual. Is it maybe worth editing this down, and shifting some of it to the page specifically for that record? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.156.71.135 (talk) 18:17, 30 December 2012 (UTC)

I completely agree, it's a mess. I started tidying it up a bit but got bored. I'll carry on with it at some point soon if no one else does. Popcornduff (talk) 00:32, 3 January 2013 (UTC)
Done the rest. Popcornduff (talk) 23:37, 3 January 2013 (UTC)

Beatles RfC[edit]

You are invited to participate in an RfC at Wikipedia talk:Requests for mediation/The Beatles on the issue of capitalizing the definite article when mentioning the band's name in running prose. This long-standing dispute is the subject of an open mediation case and we are requesting your help with determining the current community consensus. For the mediators. ~ GabeMc (talk|contribs) 00:18, 24 September 2012 (UTC)

Citation needed[edit]

electronics and lyrics inspired by war [citation needed]

Lead guitar[edit]

I don't think Jonny Greenwood is more lead than Ed O'Brien. Remember that they were jointly listed as "Greatest Guitarist".

Does someone have a source on this? --91.10.31.200 (talk) 00:12, 22 May 2013 (UTC)

Can't be bothered to find a source, but FYI, Jonny definitely plays the lead parts in most cases. I mean, if there's a clear "lead guitar" part, Jonny's always playing it... There There, Just, Paranoid Android, Staircase, 15 Step, Bodysnatchers, Knives Out, The Bends, My Iron Lung, Little by Little, Identikit, the list goes on. Ed tends to do more auxiliary/ambient stuff with lots of delay and reverb. Popcornduff (talk) 15:59, 27 May 2013 (UTC)

in songs where jonny does not play guitar, which may be a majority by now, Ed is almost always playing lead, if not Thom. Lead/Rhythm is an outdated concept for a lot of contemporary bands. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 80.229.123.246 (talk) 17:14, 26 July 2013 (UTC)

Radiohead "are" an english rock band?[edit]

What's up with that? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 187.37.85.227 (talk) 19:36, 26 May 2013 (UTC)

It's British English. See Differences_between_American_and_British_English#Grammar. Popcornduff (talk) 23:10, 26 May 2013 (UTC)

There should be a criticism section on this article

Radiohead should have a "Criticism" section. Seems like it's too biased toward Radiohead.

  1. ^ GuitarGeek.Com
  2. ^ Jonny Greenwod's 1997 Radiohead "OK Computer" Tour Guitar Rig