Talk:Randall Cunningham

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Assess[edit]

Currently almost a B, just needs a picture of him and some more college pre-college information. --Wizardman 14:28, 6 December 2006 (UTC)

when the hell did Randall play in Minnesota? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 97.116.130.217 (talk) 00:45, 10 September 2009 (UTC)

Untitled[edit]

Michael Vick is a poor man's Randall Cunningham.

What is th source for Randall being one of the greatest video game athletes of all time? Jdotpitts 21:30, 16 February 2006 (UTC)

I don't know about greatest video game athletes. But this man was possibly the greatest NFL athlete of all time. Simply amazing. Sports Illustrated dubbed him "The Ultimate Weapon". He passed, ran for yardage, punted, and returned kicks; performing all those tasks at the level of the most elite players in the game.

Career Stats[edit]

Most Rushing yards, QB (4928)--Billymac00 23:36, 16 October 2006 (UTC) randall is the greatest qb ever and i john allen will become the 2nd — Preceding unsigned comment added by 204.11.187.118 (talk) 17:10, 6 October 2014 (UTC)

Legacy[edit]

159.214.124.1 kindly refrain from editing the Legacy section and changing almost each and every verb and adjective with its pejorative counterpart so as to reflect your custom-tailored opinion. The content that has been provided prior to your agenda is the cumulative knowledge of dozens to date. It is not awaiting your monolithic and clearly biased opinion as evidenced by your aforementioned changes.

The Legacy section REALLY needs to be cleaned up, it's not NPOV. Way too many opinions.... —Preceding unsigned comment added by 64.149.165.2 (talk) 21:16, 5 August 2008 (UTC)

I really agree with this. How can you say he was the first black man to lead when Doug Williams won a Super Bowl? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.173.247.40 (talk) 03:18, 9 August 2008 (UTC)

I deleted this section, it's npov and needed to be deleted. I will delete it everytime it gets reposted.

Legacy[edit]

{{Cleanup|date=June 2007}} Cunningham arguably falls into the same genre as Barry Sanders and Warren Moon. Despite winning numerous awards and competing against the best of their era statistically, the two never had the quality coaching or supporting cast of players offensively to win a Super Bowl throughout most of their career.

Doug Scovil, the quarterbacks coach credited with developing Randall Cunningham into the starting quarterback for the Philadelphia Eagles, died in December of 1989.[1] Cunningham's head coach to date with the best winning percentage is Brian Billick 75-53 (0.586). Billick was Cunningham's head coach in Baltimore during the 2001-02 season. Billick was also Cunningham's offensive coordinator in Minnesota while the late Chip Myers [2] served as Minnesota's quarterbacks coach during the 1998-99 season.

None of Randall Cunningham's offensive lineman made the Pro Bowl during his tenure in Philadelphia. While Cunningham was an Eagle, other quarterbacks who were recipients of the NFL MVP/Player of the Year Awards (Boomer Esiason, Joe Montana, Steve Young, and Brett Favre) had offensive linemen who made the Pro Bowl while they served as quarterback for their respective teams. Former Eagles offensive guard Mike Schad stated,"Buddy always said we were two offensive linemen away from winning a Super Bowl." [3] Former Eagles tight end Keith Jackson stated,"Buddy always said that we were two offensive linemen away from dominating and winning a Super Bowl because you have to keep the quarterback healthy," [4] Former Minnesota Vikings Randall McDaniel, Todd Steussie, and Jeff Christy would be Cunningham's first Pro Bowl offensive linemen.

Despite his fame as a Super Bowl quarterback with the Chicago Bears, Jim McMahon was unable to lead the Eagles to a playoff victory when he replaced Randall for a few plays in a playoff game against the Washington Redskins during the 1990-91. When Randall Cunningham was lost for the 1991-92 season, the Eagles failed to make the playoffs despite having the number one defense in total yards. Once again when Cunningham was hurt during the 1993-94 season, the Philadelphia Eagles failed to make the playoffs.

To date NFC East teams have a combined 18 Super Bowl appearances and combined 10 wins, which is the most out of any division in the NFL. During Cunningham's 11 seasons in Philadelphia, NFC East teams won 7 Super Bowls.

Prior to Cunningham’s arrival in the NFL, the idea that African Americans could succeed at the quarterback position was questioned by some head coaches around the league. The late career success of Doug Williams, the amazing but unheralded play of Joe Gilliam, the mixed success of Vince Evans, and the sparing play of James Harris not withstanding, Randall Cunningham and Warren Moon were the first black men to lead consistently from the quarterback position. Randall’s athleticism and coach Buddy Ryan’s understanding of what kind of pressure a game-breaker like Cunningham could put on a defense, proved that a scrambler could not just survive but thrive. His success brought about the revolution of the so-called running quarterback to the modern era NFL and paved the way for players such as Daunte Culpepper, Donovan McNabb, Michael Vick, Steve McNair, Kordell Stewart, David Garrard and Vince Young. [5]Randall worked at Egecomb circle in Baltimore MD in 2002


Death[edit]

Look Im going to refrain from calling the author any names. But before you post that some one died get your facts correct. Randall Cunningham didnt die, his son died June 29, 2010 from drowing in a hotub. The former quarterback is still alive —Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.9.180.32 (talk) 18:58, 30 June 2010 (UTC)

Death of his Son[edit]

Does anyone know that the son was "unattended" or could it have been a momentary lapse of visual contact. It would be much better to acknowledge the death without speculation. It is inappropriate to lay blame at this time. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Jpet13 (talkcontribs) 21:59, 30 June 2010 (UTC)