Talk:Red supergiant

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Astronomy / Astronomical objects  (Rated Start-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon Red supergiant is within the scope of WikiProject Astronomy, which collaborates on articles related to Astronomy on Wikipedia.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject Astronomical objects, which collaborates on articles related to astronomical objects.
 

FAIL[edit]

Is this article maintained by 12 year old children?

The radius of most red giants is between 200 and 800 times that of the sun, which is still enough to reach from the sun to. The red supergiant is one of the biggest stars in the univers!

Computer generated images[edit]

I just added a note to one of the images to clarify it's not a photo. Also, the next one of our Sun is quite inaccurate, as Celestia in its latest builds (1.5) that I believe this one was generated with now use possibly untweaked halo effects to simulate brightness not possible to achieve with a computer monitor. Our Sun would not have nearly that great of a halo in the "real world", and would look just like a ordinary star, much like Betelgeuse looks from our point of view. Actually, our Sun from there would obviously be even dimmer and harder to spot than that as it's no supergiant. -- Northgrove 10:22, 9 January 2007 (UTC)

I'd personally be interested in replacing the Celestia Betelgeuse image with this one (click for QuickTime movie too) as it looks far more accurate than what is actually just a textured sphere with a halo effect, but I'm not sure about our rights for this at this point. -- Northgrove 10:43, 9 January 2007 (UTC)
Since the Celestia images provide a misleading comparison, I have removed them and put an actual image of a red supergiant in their place, as this article was lacking for real images. Chaos syndrome 16:25, 17 August 2007 (UTC)

Extreme pressure?[edit]

A red supergiant like Betelgeuse is ~15 times heavier than the Sun and many hundred times larger in diameter. Its average density thus is ten thousand times less than than of the air we breathe. So where does "the extreme pressure in a red supergiant" come from?

Leokor

Since the mass of a red giant is heavily concentrated towards its center, the pressures near its center are much higher than they would be if its mass were uniformly distributed. Cardamon 07:34, 15 October 2007 (UTC)

Links[edit]

Are The links for the Red SuperGiant "White SuperGiant" and the "Yellow SuperGiant" that is not blue suppose to be an active link?

VY Canis Majoris[edit]

VY CMa is a K-type HYPERGIANT not an M-type SUPERGIANT. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.150.46.251 (talk) 00:16, 8 December 2009 (UTC)

missing[edit]

This article is missing a clear characterization of red supergiants versus mere red giants. 22:35, 30 January 2006 (UTC)

This comment is old, but I think still valid. I'm trying to formulate a simple answer, but there is certainly some qualitative difference. All the textbooks I know seem to point to red supergiants forming from those stars that ignite carbon non-degenerately. That is, they don't have a "carbon flash" (like a helium flash, but with carbon). It's hard to disentangle why this leads to a supergiant though, because that seems to classify a star based on something that hasn't happened yet.
I think the real theoretical distinction is because red supergiants are sufficiently massive that they ignite helium in the core while they are crossing the Hertzsprung gap. This happens around 8 solar masses, it seems. That means there isn't really any ascension up the giant branch. When I've ironed this out in my own head, I'll add it to the article. Warrickball (talk) 08:56, 24 June 2011 (UTC)

Copyrighted material removed[edit]

Copyright problem removed[edit]

Prior content in this article duplicated one or more previously published sources. The material was copied from: http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/astro/redsup.html. Copied or closely paraphrased material has been rewritten or removed and must not be restored, unless it is duly released under a compatible license. (For more information, please see "using copyrighted works from others" if you are not the copyright holder of this material, or "donating copyrighted materials" if you are.) For legal reasons, we cannot accept copyrighted text or images borrowed from other web sites or published material; such additions will be deleted. Contributors may use copyrighted publications as a source of information, but not as a source of sentences or phrases. Accordingly, the material may be rewritten, but only if it does not infringe on the copyright of the original or plagiarize from that source. Please see our guideline on non-free text for how to properly implement limited quotations of copyrighted text. Wikipedia takes copyright violations very seriously, and persistent violators will be blocked from editing. While we appreciate contributions, we must require all contributors to understand and comply with these policies. Thank you. Lithopsian (talk) 21:26, 2 November 2012 (UTC)