Talk:Reims

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Joan of Arc[edit]

The history summary is too tangled to unwind with a short edit, but Joan of Arc did not expel the English from Reims. The city was subject to the independent duke of Burgundy and opened changed allegiance peacefully when she entered. Durova 21:53, 2 March 2006 (UTC)

Pagination[edit]

On my screen,duderino the article doesn't start until about 2 screens down, due to the info box presumably. Can this be fixed? Davidbod 10:46, 19 May 2006 (UTC)dude

Abbey of St-Remi[edit]

Is the abbey the same structure as St Remi Basilica or are they 2 different structures?

Wai Hong 12:40, 30 September 2006 (UTC)

sorry for the late reply: the basilica was the church of the abbey until 1790, when all religious congregations were dismantled and most of their properties sold in auction. The church then became a parochial church and has remained so since. the abbey buildings were used as a hospital for some time, then turned into a museum.Patch051 (talk) 05:08, 18 April 2009 (UTC)

En anglais, c'est Rheims[edit]

Whereas this is an article in the English Wikipedia, I have moved it to the English name for the city concerned, which is "Rheims". I shall make the needful adjustments to the text, and sort out any linking complications. -- Lonewolf BC 23:17, 20 November 2006 (UTC)

Whilst I agree that WP naming conventions encourage the use of English names in preference unless there is a reason not to (as for Antwerp instead of Anvers), I think there is no justification in this case. Naming conventions (places) states, Generally, article naming should give priority to what the majority of English speakers would most easily recognize, with a reasonable minimum of ambiguity, while at the same time making linking to those articles easy and second nature. In this case, "Rheims" is very old-fashioned and dated, and likely to cause far more confusion to readers than the French name, Reims. "Rheims" is very rarely used formally or officially any more, and would be deprecated by most newspapers etc. It's the equivalent to insisting that Gdansk should be located at Danzig or Ypres should be at Wipers. In France, we have Lyon not Lyons. In terms of Ghits, from google.co.uk "Reims" gets 444,000 [1] whilst "Rheims" gets a mere 59,100 [2]. If it's not even the prevalent name on g.co.uk (never mind g.com), then I think it's hard to justify as the most common usage. I propose it be moved back to Reims. DWaterson 23:40, 29 November 2006 (UTC)
As there have been no further comments, I have moved the page back to Reims.DWaterson 16:07, 11 December 2006 (UTC)
'"Rheims" is very old-fashioned and dated' I just came across this and I find it to be a truly extraordinary statement. A native English speaker and reader of many years, this is the first time I have seen the spelling 'Reims' used intentionally. This should clearly be headed 'Rheims' - fortunately, redirection works or I would never have located the article. 139.163.138.12 05:45, 22 October 2007 (UTC)
I've always seen it as Rheims, however I do not read nearly enough about Franch and French history and geography for my own good, so I don't know how much my say matters...Cameron Nedland 23:06, 3 December 2007 (UTC)
If "Rheims" may be used in Britain, we must not forget that British people are only a small number of English-speaking people in the world. Most of English Wikipedia readers will never know about "Rheims". So it is better to avoid any confusion and stick to "Reims". The ever broadening use of the internet makes that position all the more necessary, as the number of Google references is roughly 10 times higher for "Reims" than for "Rheims", not taking into account that "Rheims" is also a family name... Patch051 (talk) 05:03, 18 April 2009 (UTC)
I agree that the title should be Reims. Although it's nice in a way that we have our own way of spelling city names, e.g. Brunswick, Nuremberg, they're becoming a hindrance. These days we're as likely to visit these places as we are to read about them in the newspaper. I'd even pronounce it the French way (ranss) nowadays. 82.46.175.44 (talk) 03:06, 20 November 2013 (UTC)

Douay-Rheims Bible[edit]

Since most English speakers who are familiar with Rheims are probably going to be familiar with this city because of the Douay-Rheims Bible, keeping the traditional spelling (with the h) seems in order. 64.85.229.248 (talk) 07:58, 7 September 2009 (UTC)

There is no reason for one to follow from the other necessarily - for example, we talk about the Council of Trent but now most commonly use Trento for the city of its origin. Knepflerle (talk) 13:48, 17 October 2009 (UTC)
As the title page used to illustrate the Douay-Rheims Bible article uses the spelling "Rhemes", this is not a very convincing argument for keeping this article under the name "Rheims". --Daemonic Kangaroo (talk) 06:18, 24 October 2009 (UTC)

In English it's 'Rheims'. In the city itself in English it's Rheims, which goes to show a long and honourable history long before America was invented. Or am I required in Wikipedia to spell that 'honorable'? Drg40 (talk) 17:56, 19 July 2010 (UTC)

Requested move[edit]

The following discussion is an archived discussion of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on the talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

The result of the move request was page moved.  Skomorokh, barbarian  11:23, 27 October 2009 (UTC)


RheimsReims — [Although "Rheims" may be the historically correct name, it is hardly used elsewhere; the commonly accepted name is the French spelling "Reims"] --Daemonic Kangaroo (talk) 21:31, 15 October 2009 (UTC)

I couldn't find the discussion on the move request page. Eric talk 13:18, 15 October 2009 (UTC)

Oppose Reims is used by 508 English language books published since 1990, while Rheims is used by 570. Thus, Rheims is the most common name, as well as the historically correct name. Surtsicna (talk) 08:39, 16 October 2009 (UTC)

Those results are so contaminated with foreign-language texts and false positives (e.g, those written by Bettina Rheims) as to be meaningless. Saying that one name is the historical correct name when both are clearly widely used over a long period of time is mere linguistic prescriptivism. Knepflerle (talk) 13:34, 17 October 2009 (UTC)

Let's have a look at other tertiary sources for a general audience as suggested by WP:NAME - Britannica uses Reims, Columbia uses Reims, Encarta uses Reims, World Book uses Reims, the Catholic Encyclopedia uses Reims - a full house there. What about recent use in media? Google news gives about 1,740 uses for Reims, and only 24(!) for Rheims. That alone sheds serious doubt on the continuing use of Rheims in standard English writing. The city's website uses Reims for itself in English [3] also. The evidence supports the move quite strongly. Knepflerle (talk) 13:34, 17 October 2009 (UTC)

Support. Rheims is old-fashioned like Marseilles, Leghorn, Elsinore, Brunswick and other names that were in regular use in English but very rare now. Over time, the number of cities that have commonly used special names in English is diminishing and English Wikipedia, read throughout the world, should be forward- rather than backward-looking in cases like this. Sussexonian (talk) 20:39, 18 October 2009 (UTC)

The above discussion is preserved as an archive of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on this talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

Other buildings[edit]

The sentence about the "Surrender Museum" had the phrase "stands on the spot". This phrase means (in American English) that the original building (if any) on that site is no longer standing; that the current building was not there at the time of the event being commemorated. But the current building is very much the same building that was there in 1945 and in which the surrender took place. In fact the walls of the surrender room still have the war maps that were there at the signing.

So I changed the phrase to correctly state the facts.

Nick Beeson (talk) 18:34, 16 June 2011 (UTC)