Talk:Remington Model 1100

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Nonsense[edit]

The line on side ejection is utter nonsense. Every shotgun that isn't a break open sort is a side ejection model. Beyond that, the 1100 is a shotgun widely used in trap shooting. Beyond that, if it were a problem on the trap range, it would be an even greater problem when hunting. Having shot trap for over 30 years- almost all of it with an 1100, this is the first I've EVER heard that.

  • Note on the above: There are several shotguns that are not side ejection models. One that comes to mind immediately is the Ithaca 37, which both loads and ejects from the bottom. This makes it completely ambidextrous in use.

I've seen several bottom-ejects, mostly pumps, but the new CTi from Remington happens to bottom eject.

Browning shotguns bottom eject too. Niteshift36 (talk) 05:09, 31 December 2007 (UTC)
Don't your ejected shells bother the shooter on your right? Also, the newest semi-auto Remington, the 105CTi, ejects downward. So does the Beretta break-open semi-auto, the UGB25. The Remington literature describes this feature advantage as, "... there’s no peripheral distraction from ejecting shells." The Beretta literature describes this as, "The ejector expels the spent hull downwards, away from the shooter and nearby competitors, ... ".

I've seen bolt action shotguns before.

  • Note on Trivia: the previous claim of the Remington 1100 being Ash Williams' shotgun of choice was false. Ash used a and I quote: "twelve gauge double barreled Remington." He says this quite clearly in his famous Boomstick speech.
See:
http://www.remington.com/products/firearms/shotguns/model_105CTi.asp
and,
http://www.berettausa.com/product/spotlight/spotlight_competition_ugb25.cfm
RPellessier | Talk 06:03, 26 March 2006 (UTC)

Field Version[edit]

A picture of a field version of the gun is desired. Goldfishsoldier 07:42, 15 July 2007 (UTC)

Tactical Version[edit]

Since the article uses 2 pictures of the Tactical model, shouldn't we at least mention the tactical model in the article? And it's use? Niteshift36 (talk) 05:11, 31 December 2007 (UTC)

  • Note on Trivia: the previous claim of the Remington 1100 being Ash Williams' shotgun of choice was false. Ash used a and I quote: "twelve gauge double barreled Remington." He says this quite clearly in his famous Boomstick speech.
See:
http://www.remington.com/products/firearms/shotguns/model_105CTi.asp
and,
http://www.berettausa.com/product/spotlight/spotlight_competition_ugb25.cfm
RPellessier | Talk 06:03, 26 March 2006 (UTC)

Dates of Introduction[edit]

The dates of introduction are listed for the various gauges do not match what Remington will tell a caller to their historical department.

I have in my possession an 1100 in 20 gauge that was confirmed by Remington as having been manufactured in 1968 as a part of a 4-gun set that included 12, 16, 20 and 28 gauge guns. According to the Remington historian I spoke with, all four gauges, plus .410, were available in 1963. They were, however, built on the 12ga. frame, rather than being built on gauge-specific frames. The gauge-specific frames were introduced in 1974 as "LWT" models. Kemkerj (talk) 02:43, 2 May 2008 (UTC)