Talk:Respiratory system

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Intro[edit]

The opening paragraph contains the following: "and the blood." While gases diffuse in a passive manner between alvioli and the blood, I do not think we should state this as passgas because the diaphragm contracts, consuming energy, therefore making the process as a whole active. --Glasgallow 16:45, 29 January 2006 (UTC)

Under physiology in mammals>inhalation, the second sentence doesn't make sense. Is the "time period" a rest between breaths? Swyilk (talk) 14:41, 20 March 2012 (UTC)

Two empty sections[edit]

Someone seems to have added sections 1.1.1.4 and 1.1.1.5 to the article but they currently have no info (just the headers); I'm not the best biologist in the Marines so could someone add something to it? Thanks :)

-- Supernova0 :) 00:48, 12 November 2009 (UTC)

Trees consume oxygen[edit]

"Even trees have respiratory systems, taking in carbon dioxide and emitting oxygen during the day, consuming carbon dioxide and producing oxygen constantly." Actually, plants also consume oxygen, no? That is, they are aerobic organisms, like animals, that use oxygen to break down food. I think it's important to mention this, because it's a common misconception that plants do not use oxygen. I'm neither a plant physiologist nor wiki-savvy, but can someone who is both edit this accordingly? Thanks. Rufescens 21:23, 4 September 2005 (UTC)

I believe it's pefectly correct as is, that is "taking in carbon dioxide and emitting oxygen during the day". It just doesn't say everything. Probably should be edited anyway, though. Snake712 11:43, 2 May 2006 (UTC)

needs cleaning up[edit]

I've added the cleanup-date tag to the top of the article, as it needs some serious work in terms of wikification (paragraph gaps are messed up etc.) and the text doesn't flow well. Parts of the article give the impression of having been copy-pasted from somewhere. --222.153.190.49 01:07, 2 October 2005 (UTC)

pictures?[edit]

I think this article would be served well by a picture, maybe something out of Gray's Anatomy. Does anyone have any suggestions? Gary 21:26, 29 April 2006 (UTC)

I found an illustration that might be useful, but I don't know how to put it into the article. Maybe someone more knowledgable about Wikipedia can add it. I think Fig. 962 from the link below would work nicely. Of course, if someone else finds a better one, that can be used instead. http://www.bartleby.com/107/237.html


Gary 04:36, 10 May 2006 (UTC)

It's been added. Gray's Anatomy? Really? There are other shows that give you a clearer view. I do love Gray's Anatomy, though.

YES IT IS A RIGHT THING — Preceding unsigned comment added by 117.196.33.135 (talk) 09:59, 31 May 2013 (UTC)

Unconscious breathing[edit]

I think it would be interesting to see a section on the differences between conscious and unconscious breating, if there is much known about it. Meekohi 20:15, 1 November 2006 (UTC)


QUESTION what is produced by the body when oxgen isn't respired im doing sports studies and i can't find the answer anywhere

Carbon Monoxide. I though that human's produced that, didn't they?

respiratory hubert ly[edit]

I have added "respiratory tract" to the list under "See also". I think the respiratory tract is part of the respiratory system: The respiratory system is not a part of the respiratory tract, but comparing the two articles it seens they would have you believe that the respiratory system is part of the respiratory tract and that the respiratory tract is not completely encluded by the term "respiratory system". Alec - U.K.

Entrance of Air[edit]

Air can enter the respiratory system through the mouth or oral cavity as well as the nostrils and nasal cavity, it doesn't seem to acknowledge this...

Quality of Article[edit]

This is a terrible article. It really needs work done to it. The quality of this article is completely compromised. I guess that is why it is being cleaned-up... —The preceding unsigned comment was added by Chem Lady (talkcontribs) 00:54, 15 December 2006 (UTC). Big tits — Preceding unsigned comment added by 108.20.117.93 (talk) 19:21, 15 March 2014 (UTC)

Vandalizm[edit]

At the end of the paragraph on the upper resparatory tract, it says "You can also suck a dick". Would a user in good standing please fix this or revert the change made by Marianoburroughs101.

                                                                           Good work clean up task force !!

Non-human systems[edit]

I actually came here hoping for some comparitive analysis of different kinds of respiratory systems, or at least links to "reptile respiration" or something. It's rather misleading that the first paragraph says "even trees," yet the article proceeds to only talk about human respiration without explaining that choice. Should the lead be rewritten to reflect the actual focus of the article (human respiration)? NickelShoe (Talk) 19:33, 6 June 2007 (UTC)

Medical treatment, surgical procedures and equipment?[edit]

How should medical articles related to the Respiratory system be linked to the category? I just did a change on Flutter valve to this category from where it was inexplicably pointed to Digestive system. Hmm, there doesn't seem to actually be a Respiratory system *category*, just this article.

Misspelling[edit]

Under the paragraph Development, the last sentence has the word steroid spelled as "steriod." This should be fixed. Thanks

Thanks for the notice. Fixed. NickelShoe (Talk) 13:20, 8 July 2007 (UTC)

respiratory system[edit]

Eva Anderson is 85years old.Her breathing is heavy and she feels tired at any physical effort.Sometimes she feels pain in her breastbone and in her left arm when she is walking upstairs.At rest she feels good and has no physical problems. Describe the changes which may have lead to these symptoms in the body. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 193.167.35.208 (talk) 07:10, 4 December 2007 (UTC)

Spam on Talk page deleted[edit]

(Spam on Talk Page [here] Deleted) Freebullets (talk) 05:08, 21 January 2008 (UTC)

"Conduction Zone" and "Respiratory Zone"[edit]

The article states:

"In humans and other animals, the respiratory system can be conveniently subdivided into an upper respiratory tract (or conducting zone) and lower respiratory tract (respiratory zone), trachea and lungs."

The classification here of conducting and respiratory zones is not accurate. The conducting zone (in which no actual gas exchange occurs) extends from the upper respiratory tract (as stated) but also includes the trachea, bronchi, and larger bronchioles. The respiratory zone is limited to terminal bronchioles and alveoli. These are the only structures in which oxygen and carbon dioxide can actually pass between the lung and the blood.

Lgin (talk) 19:41, 7 February 2008 (UTC)

"Role in Communication"[edit]

The "Role in Communication" has two equals symbols in front and one after; I presume it is supposed to only have one before, so as to be a higher-level category. However the subsequent sections ("Conditions of.." and "Gas exchange in plants") don't seem to be sub-categories of "Role in Communication." I am making all of these subsequent sub-sections into top-level sections. If this is incorrect, please correct it, and I'd also like to know how I could have known if I am wrong. Thanks!

Eouw0o83hf (talk) 15:14, 21 February 2008 (UTC)

Actually, I found out that the following sub-sections were fixed when adding a second equals sign after. I haven't done extensive wiki formatting, so I forgot that it takes two equals signs to make a section header...So, the issue was easily remedied with replacing the second equals sign that had apparently disappeared.
Eouw0o83hf (talk) 15:17, 21 February 2008 (UTC)


This section should be qualified in one important way: "extremely vital for *verbal* communication purposes."

(no user, or I'd update it myself) 2010 July 31 12:42 (UTC)

Question!?[edit]

what is the term/word used to discribe when you breath in fully but then force more air in. what is the term for the volume of air you are adding to the tidal volume? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 124.181.49.31 (talk) 11:47, 22 May 2008 (UTC)

I think that you are referring to forced vital capacity (FVC). For your second question, I am not sure that I know what term you are referring to. If you have other questions, please do not hesitate to ask me on my talk page. Tyrol5 [Talk] 21:58, 9 February 2009 (UTC)

Posterior???[edit]

While my knowledge of anatomical terms may be a bit dated, I strenuously doubt that humans--even at the DMV--breathe through their anal regions (even if some turtles can). Still, the article lists the "Posterior" as the first part of the airway. Is this a sneaky vandalism/joke? Piledhigheranddeeper (talk) 16:13, 29 May 2008 (UTC) Posterior is the correct term. However, I agree that human's probably cannot breathe using their ass holes. But, I'm not a scientist. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 99.247.244.120 (talk) 23:53, 26 September 2008 (UTC)

insects[edit]

..In humans and other animals, the respiratory system can be conveniently subdivided into an upper respiratory tract and lower respiratory tract, trachea and lungs, ...

I think the term 'animals' might take some refinement. I do not think it applies to most animals,e.g. the many species of insects that live on this planet. Could the article be a little less homo- of mammaliacentric? Jcwf (talk) 00:00, 19 August 2008 (UTC)

Respiratory physiology and respiration merge?[edit]

I would like to encourage those who work on this page to also examine two pages: Respiratory physiology and respiration (physiology). What would people think about merging these two pages? I also think it would be redundant to present any more informaiton on respiratory physiology on the respiatory system page; therefore, I have added only links to that section. Comments?LLDMart (talk) 13:44, 10 September 2008 (UTC)

The Respiratory System

After reading about the Respiratory System @ school I wanted to know more. WHEN YOU HAVE AN ASTHMA ATTACK DOES AN INHALER HELP RECOVER THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM?????

When one uses an inhaler, they inhale medication such as Salmeterol that helps you recover. Because an asthma attack is constriction of the airways, the medication in the inhaler acts as a Bronchodilator to cease the restriction and help the victim recover.
I do not believe that the two articles mentioned should be merged as they are two different topics. One covers the physiology of the respiratory system and the other deals with the physiology and mechanics of respiration (breathing itself). Thanks anyway for your suggestion, as I am sure that you intend to improve Wikipedia. If you have any more questions relating to the respiratory system, please do not hesitate to ask me on my talk page. Tyrol5 [Talk] 19:57, 9 February 2009 (UTC)

sunenomous[edit]

what is the cure? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 194.73.114.209 (talk) 09:17, 10 July 2009 (UTC)

windpipe[edit]

When breathing in, how is the air in the windpipe different from the air outside? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 218.186.11.228 (talk) 12:24, 29 July 2009 (UTC)


Unreferenced tag[edit]

I have removed the unreferenced tag because the article obviously has sources. --Rent A Troop (talk) 23:23, 3 August 2009 (UTC)

other name for respiratory system[edit]

the respiratory system can also be called the pulmonary system which means the same thing but might be preferred by some people and scientists. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Zapulator (talkcontribs) 19:19, 30 October 2009 (UTC)

what is the respotory system? it is a pathway for the oxygen to go through all the body parts and this is related to physical fitness because they need to exersise to keep your heart healthy --74.60.32.229 (talk) 00:12, 20 May 2010 (UTC)so you can breathe

Quick edit[edit]

"The rspiratory helps your lungs do stuff that makes you do stuff that makes u live cause thats how it works"

^^Decided to remove that part, and a duplicate section on the talk page. 99.60.32.150 (talk) 04:15, 21 May 2010 (UTC)

everyone i need some help on what else works with the respiratory system!!!! it would be such a good help if u guys could help thanks —Preceding unsigned comment added by 97.124.200.242 (talk) 01:56, 10 February 2011 (UTC)

This page needs protection[edit]

Dear Wikipedia contributors,

I would like like to thank for all your efforts to spread knowledge. Nevertheless, vandalism has heavily affected this article too often. I think it is time to protect it. Any opinions? Can someone with more experience do this, please?

Thanks in advance! George Rodney Maruri Game (talk) 02:43, 26 April 2011 (UTC)

I agree this page seems to attract more than a fair share of unconstructive edits, but it also seems to be on the watchlists of quite a few active editors. Not feeling strongly about it one way or another, I don't believe it needs protection just yet. __ Just plain Bill (talk) 03:32, 26 April 2011 (UTC)

biology[edit]

what is gaseous exchange in plants..??(175.110.71.156 (talk) 18:10, 19 July 2013 (UTC))

Respiration. See Cellular respiration.

Insects: Spelling/grammar corrections, requesting approval.[edit]

Plain text only; existing links not indicated.

ORIGINAL: "Most insects breath passively through their spiracles (special openings in the exoskeleton) and the air reaches the body by means of a series of smaller and smaller pipes called 'trachaea' when their diameter is relatively large and 'tracheoles' when their diameter is very small. Diffusion of gases is effective over small distances but not over larger ones, this is one of the reasons insects are all relatively small. Insects which do not have spiracles and trachaea, such as some Collembola, breathe directly through their skins, also by diffusion of gases.[7] The number of spiracles an insect has is variable between species, however they always come in pairs, one on each side of the body, and usually one per segment. Some of the Diplura have eleven, with four pairs on the thorax, but in most of the ancient forms of insects, such as Dragonflies and Grasshoppers there are two thoracic and eight abdominal spiracles. However in most of the remaining insects there are less. It is at this level of the tracheoles that oxygen is delivered to the cells for respiration. The trachea are water-filled due to the permeable membrane of the surrounding tissues. During exercise, the water level retracts due to the increase in concentration of lactic acid in the muscle cells. This lowers the water potential and the water is drawn back into the cells via osmosis and air is brought closer to the muscle cells. The diffusion pathway is then reduced and gases can be transferred more easily.

Insects were once believed to exchange gases with the environment continuously by the simple diffusion of gases into the tracheal system. More recently, however, large variation in insect ventilatory patterns have been documented and insect respiration appears to be highly variable. Some small insects do demonstrate continuous respiration and may lack muscular control of the spiracles. Others, however, utilize muscular contraction of the abdomen along with coordinated spiracle contraction and relaxation to generate cyclical gas exchange patterns and to reduce water loss into the atmosphere. The most extreme form of these patterns is termed discontinuous gas exchange cycles (DGC).[8]"

CORRECTED VERSION (changed words or phrases indicated in bold): Most insects breathe passively through their spiracles (special openings in the exoskeleton), and the air reaches the body by means of a series of progressively smaller pipes. These pipes are called 'tracheae' when their diameter is relatively large and 'tracheoles' when their diameter is very small. Diffusion of gasses is effective over small distances only. This is one of the reasons why insects are [celeted ALL] relatively small. Insects that do not have spiracles and tracheae, such as some Collembola, breathe directly through their skins via diffusion of gasses.[7] The number of spiracles an insect has varies among species; however, they always come in pairs, one on each side of the body, and usually one per segment. Some of the Diplura have eleven, with four pairs on the thorax, but in most of the ancient forms of insects, such as Dragonflies and Grasshoppers there are two thoracic and eight abdominal spiracles. However, in most of the remaining insects, there are fewer. It is at this level of the tracheoles that oxygen is delivered to the cells for respiration. The tracheae are water-filled due to the permeable membrane of the surrounding tissue. During exercise, the water level retracts due to the increase in concentration of lactic acid in the muscle cells. This lowers the water potential, drawing water back into the cells via osmosis and allowing air to be brought closer to the muscle cells. The diffusion pathway is then reduced and gases can be transferred more easily.

Insects were once believed to exchange gasses with the environment continuously by the simple diffusion of gasses into the tracheal system. More recently, however, large variation in insect ventilation patterns have been documented. [Omitted remainder of sentence.] Some small insects do demonstrate continuous respiration and may lack muscular control of the spiracles. Others, however, utilize muscular contraction of the abdomen along with coordinated spiracle contraction and relaxation to generate cyclical gas exchange patterns and to reduce evaporative water loss. The most extreme form of these patterns is termed 'discontinuous gas exchange cycle' (DGC).[8] ReaderWriterArtist (talk) 01:09, 4 December 2013 (UTC)

About the respiratory system[edit]

The respiratory system helps you breath. It takes in oxygen and takes out the carbon dioxide. Its like a cycle. Without the respiratory system, the human body wont exist. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 64.180.19.60 (talk) 05:24, 10 January 2014 (UTC)

Carbon dioxide[edit]

The carbon dioxide is just a kind of air that takes the waste out of your body. It goes through your lungs then comes out. It goes in a cycle with the oxygen. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 64.180.19.60 (talk) 05:28, 10 January 2014 (UTC)

Separate page[edit]

Since the articles on Lung have been separated into Human lung and Lungs, think a separation would benefit both articles with a page on Human respiratory system and this one which has a mish-mash of content but which could benefit by expansion on non-human items. Would welcome any views. Iztwoz (talk) 11:17, 26 April 2014 (UTC)